December 2001
Volume 1, Issue 3
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2001
The weights of space and time in the perception of visual motion
Author Affiliations
  • Sergei Gepshtein
    School of Optometry, Vision Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA
  • Michael Kubovy
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA
Journal of Vision December 2001, Vol.1, 243. doi:10.1167/1.3.243
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      Sergei Gepshtein, Michael Kubovy; The weights of space and time in the perception of visual motion. Journal of Vision 2001;1(3):243. doi: 10.1167/1.3.243.

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Abstract

PURPOSE The propensity of successive discrete elements to be perceived as a single object in motion is called the strength of apparent motion (AM). We ask how space and time determine the strength of AM (SAM). There are two conflicting views on this matter. According to Korte's Third Law, if the temporal interval between the two elements is increased, their spatial distance must be increased in order to maintain the same SAM. On the other hand, according to Burt and Sperling (1981), if the temporal interval between the two elements is increased, their spatial distance must be decreased in order to maintain the same SAM. METHOD We used rapidly alternating patterns of regularly spaced dots, called motion lattices, in which observers can see alternative paths of AM. Within every path we varied spatial and temporal parameters and looked for conditions with different space-time combinations that yielded the same SAM. We found these points of perceptual equivalence between motion paths under different spatial scales. RESULTS We found that both Korte's law and the Burt/Sperling theory are correct, but under different spatial scales. Korte's law holds for large scales, whereas the Burt/Sperling theory holds for small scales. Between these two extremes, we found a spatial scale for which the SAM does not depend on the temporal interval between elements.

Gepshtein, S., Kubovy, M.(2001). The weights of space and time in the perception of visual motion [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 1( 3): 243, 243a, http://journalofvision.org/1/3/243/, doi:10.1167/1.3.243. [CrossRef]
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