December 2001
Volume 1, Issue 3
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2001
Contextual modulation in primary visual cortex as a neuronal substrate for working memory
Author Affiliations
  • H. Supèr
    Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Dept. VSA,AMC, UvA, The Netherlands
  • H. Spekreijse
    Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Dept. VSA,AMC, UvA, The Netherlands
  • V. A. F. Lamme
    Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Dept. VSA,AMC, UvA, The Netherlands
Journal of Vision December 2001, Vol.1, 345. doi:10.1167/1.3.345
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      H. Supèr, H. Spekreijse, V. A. F. Lamme; Contextual modulation in primary visual cortex as a neuronal substrate for working memory. Journal of Vision 2001;1(3):345. doi: 10.1167/1.3.345.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The visual scene is perceived as a composition of objects from which we select those that are meaningful to us. Sometimes this information needs to be maintained for a short period of time since in the constant and rapidly changing visual world a stimulus may have disappeared whereas a behavioral response to the stimulus still has to be made. During this memory period, neurons in the higher visual areas increase their firing rate to the stimulus.

In the primary visual cortex, neurons indicate whether a possible target is within their receptive fields by a late enhanced activity. This activity —contextual modulation- originates partly from feedback projections from the extra-striate cortical areas. Thus, contextual modulation in the primary visual cortex combines retinal information with activity already processed in higher visual areas.

We recorded from neurons in the primary visual cortex of macaque monkeys engaged in a delayed-response figure-ground discrimination task where the animals had to remember the location of a briefly presented figure. The results demonstrate that contextual modulation is maintained, even when the stimulus is not present, until a behavioral response is made. The strength of this modulation is weakened in case the stimulus has become irrelevant or when the stimulus position has been misjudged i.e. forgotten.

In conclusion, contextual modulation in the primary visual cortex may serve as a neural substrate for working memory.

Supèr, H., Spekreijse, H., Lamme, V.A.F.(2001). Contextual modulation in primary visual cortex as a neuronal substrate for working memory [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 1( 3): 345, 345a, http://journalofvision.org/1/3/345/, doi:10.1167/1.3.345. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×