December 2001
Volume 1, Issue 3
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2001
The visual recognition of rotated shapes
Author Affiliations
  • A. Reeves
    Northeastern University, Boston, USA
  • S. DeCaro
    Fooyin Institute of Technology, Taiwan
Journal of Vision December 2001, Vol.1, 90. doi:10.1167/1.3.90
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      A. Reeves, S. DeCaro; The visual recognition of rotated shapes. Journal of Vision 2001;1(3):90. doi: 10.1167/1.3.90.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Rotating depictions of familiar shapes and objects away from a learnt(‘canonical’) orientation often increases the time required for visual identification (RT), in a nearly linear manner. This has suggested to some that the brain ‘rotates’ the misoriented input image back to the canonical view to support recognition. We dispute this conclusion because (a) it implies prior knowledge of the optimal direction and extent of rotation for an as-yet- unrecognized object, but both backward-masking by pattern and word-picture verification show earlier encoding for identity than for orientation; and (b) these same two procedures show there is an efficient form of recognition that is generally stable from at least 60 to 180-deg of rotation. Moreover, whereas the large progressive effects of orientation on RT are limited to novel views and diminish quickly *after* repetition, our results are obtained with novel (non-repeated) depictions, suggesting the initial RT effect is due to the ‘shock’ value of a newly- misoriented object. We conclude that basic-level recognition of common objects relies on direct matching of features for canonical views, and on view-independent visual cues (such as cross-ratios bound by inflection points) for rotated views. The view-independent route is only prone to effects of unexpected views at a later stage involving verification.

Reeves, A., DeCaro, S.(2001). The visual recognition of rotated shapes [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 1( 3): 90, 90a, http://journalofvision.org/1/3/90/, doi:10.1167/1.3.90. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×