November 2002
Volume 2, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   November 2002
The interactive effects of symmetry and binocular disparity on visual surface representation
Author Affiliations
  • Armando Bertone
    Ecole d'Optometrie, Universite de Montreal
Journal of Vision November 2002, Vol.2, 94. doi:10.1167/2.7.94
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      Armando Bertone, Jocelyn Faubert; The interactive effects of symmetry and binocular disparity on visual surface representation. Journal of Vision 2002;2(7):94. doi: 10.1167/2.7.94.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose. In order to recognize an object in our environment, we must first create a representation of its visual surface. Visual surface representation implicates the encoding and grouping of image attributes belonging to a same surface. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of bilateral symmetry and binocular disparity on the perception of a visual surface and how these two image features interact with each other. Methods. Exp. 1: Symmetrical dot patterns were presented to 3 observers with both halves of the pattern on either the same or different depth planes (disparity: 60.4 and 122.9 sec arc) for 250 msec. A 2ATFC constant stimuli procedure was used to measure symmetry detection thresholds (% matching dots) at each level of disparity. Exp. 2: Using the same procedure as Experiment 1, depth detection thresholds were measured at 4 levels of disparity (0, 30.1, 60.4, and 122.9 sec arc) for different levels of symmetry (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 75 & 100 % matching dots). Results. Exp. 1: Symmetry detection thresholds increased as a function of binocular disparity for all three observers. Exp. 2: The amount of symmetry in the pattern did not have an effect on the observers' ability to identify depth for any of the 4 levels of disparity. Conclusions. Under the specific stimulus parameters used, results suggest that depth created by disparity is a more predominant image attribute than is symmetry for visual surface representation. We are presently assessing whether manipulating certain temporal parameters (i.e., stimulus exposure duration) affects this predominance.

Bertone, A., Faubert, J.(2002). The interactive effects of symmetry and binocular disparity on visual surface representation [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 2( 7): 94, 94a, http://journalofvision.org/2/7/94/, doi:10.1167/2.7.94. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 Support: NSERC OGP01221333(JF) & CIHR fellowship (AB).
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