October 2003
Volume 3, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   October 2003
Disparity gradient between the target and its surroundings defines depth discrimination threshold
Author Affiliations
  • Yury Petrov
    Oxford University, UK
Journal of Vision October 2003, Vol.3, 65. doi:10.1167/3.9.65
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      Yury Petrov, Andrew Glennerster; Disparity gradient between the target and its surroundings defines depth discrimination threshold. Journal of Vision 2003;3(9):65. doi: 10.1167/3.9.65.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Stereoacuity thresholds have been shown to depend on the disparity of a point with respect to a slanted reference plane through neighbouring points (A. Glennerster et al., Current Biology, vol. 12, 825–828(2002)). Here we explored a wider range of conditions, including slanting the reference points about a horizontal axis and varying the spacing of the reference dots, allowing alternative hypotheses for the effect to be distinguished. The stimulus consisted of 3 dots; the outer two defined a line that was slanted in depth. Observers judged in which of two intervals the third, central dot was displaced from the location midway between the outer reference dots. The displacement consisted of both a disparity and a shift in the fronto-parallel plane. We compared performance for pairs of conditions in which the disparity was the same but the fronto-parallel shifts were in opposite directions. Models based purely on relative disparity do not predict a difference in performance for these conditions. We found consistent differences. Performance was always better when the target had a greater disparity with respect to the line joining the reference dots. The other stimulus parameters varied were: target disparity (concave/convex), stimulus size (large/small), slant sign (sky/ground) and axis (vertical/horizontal), Performance was only affected significantly by changing the stimulus orientation from vertical to horizontal. The results suggest that disparity gradient change, rather than disparity or disparity curvature, determines the depth discrimination threshold for these stimuli.

Petrov, Y., Glennerster, A.(2003). Disparity gradient between the target and its surroundings defines depth discrimination threshold [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 3( 9): 65, 65a, http://journalofvision.org/3/9/65/, doi:10.1167/3.9.65. [CrossRef]
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