June 2004
Volume 4, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2004
Spatial Vision and the Visual Cortex: can we establish a connection?
Author Affiliations
  • Robert Shapley
    Center for Neural Science, New York University
Journal of Vision August 2004, Vol.4, 118. doi:10.1167/4.8.118
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Robert Shapley; Spatial Vision and the Visual Cortex: can we establish a connection?. Journal of Vision 2004;4(8):118. doi: 10.1167/4.8.118.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Finding a connection between the activity of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) and spatial vision was one of Russ DeValois's scientific goals. It is a hard problem because of the populations of neurons involved, the diversity of their visual spatial properties, and the dynamics of their responses. But trying to solve this tough problem has produced unexpected insights into how the cortex works. Cortical inhibition and feedback are of fundamental importance, for the dynamics, for feature selectivity, and for modulation by spatial context. Diversity (of V1 neurons) is a feature, not a bug. Color and spatial form are analyzed together in a single class of neurons: the spatially tuned, double-opponent neurons. Looking for the connection between Spatial Vision and the Visual Cortex has taught us about the cortex, and we hope it will teach us also about vision.

Shapley, R.(2004). Spatial Vision and the Visual Cortex: can we establish a connection? [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 4( 8): 118, 118a, http://journalofvision.org/4/8/118/, doi:10.1167/4.8.118. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×