September 2005
Volume 5, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2005
Background stripes affect apparent speed of rotation
Author Affiliations
  • Stuart Anstis
    Psychology, UCSD, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla CA 92093-0109. 858-534-5456
  • Hiroyuki Ito
    Visual Communication Design, Kyushu University, 4-9-1, Shiobaru, Minami-ku, Fukuoka-shi, 815-8540Japan
Journal of Vision September 2005, Vol.5, 1060. doi:10.1167/5.8.1060
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      Stuart Anstis, Hiroyuki Ito; Background stripes affect apparent speed of rotation. Journal of Vision 2005;5(8):1060. doi: 10.1167/5.8.1060.

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Abstract

A gray line that rotated at constant speed against a stationary background of vertical stripes appeared to double in perceptual speed as it rotated through the vertical position and was momentarily aligned with the background. Two stimulus features might be at work: landmarks, where the tip of the moving vertical line moves horizontally across the maximum number of stationary stripes, and moiré intersections between stripes and moving lines, which move most rapidly when the line is near vertical. To isolate the contribution of landmarks, a white ring was as placed over the grating, and short radial lines ran around this ring. This provided landmarks but no intersections, and the illusion disappeared. To isolate the contribution of intersections, a slit in a virtual black occluder rotated in front of the grating, which was thus seen only through the slit. This provided moiré intersections but no landmarks, and the illusion increased. We conclude that the moiré intersections are entirely responsible for the perceived speed changes. Consistent with this, we find that when a line rotates on a plain grey background, dots that run back and forth along the length of the line can modulate its perceived speed, which indicates a failure to decouple radial from tangential velocity components.

Anstis, S. Ito, H. (2005). Background stripes affect apparent speed of rotation [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 5(8):1060, 1060a, http://journalofvision.org/5/8/1060/, doi:10.1167/5.8.1060. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 SA: Visting Fellowship, Pembroke College, Oxford. HI: Grant-in-Aid for the 21st Century COE Program, Kyushu University.
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