September 2005
Volume 5, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2005
The effect of ocular dominance and interocular rivalry on monocular reading speed under near-normal, ganzfeld, and complete occlusion conditions
Author Affiliations
  • Nathalie Duponsel
    School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada
  • Olga Overbury
    Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada
Journal of Vision September 2005, Vol.5, 11. doi:10.1167/5.8.11
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      Nathalie Duponsel, Olga Overbury; The effect of ocular dominance and interocular rivalry on monocular reading speed under near-normal, ganzfeld, and complete occlusion conditions. Journal of Vision 2005;5(8):11. doi: 10.1167/5.8.11.

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Abstract

Purpose: Normal reading typically involves binocular processes. However, in the case of monocular reading, the non-reading eye may interfere with the processes of the reading eye depending on the nature of the input to that eye. Furthermore, this interference may differ depending on whether the eye reading is the dominant or non-dominant eye.

Method: The monocular reading speed of seventeen participants with normal vision was tested under six conditions. Three conditions tested the reading speed of the dominant eye while the non-dominant eye received patterned input, light input, or no input, and the other three conditions were similar for the non-dominant eye.

Results: No difference in monocular reading speed was found between the dominant and non-dominant eye. A significant difference was found between patterned input and light input (p p Conclusions: While dominance does not seem to play a role in monocular reading, the level of input into the non-reading eye heavily affected monocular reading speed. Specifically, patterned input in the non-reading eye negatively affected monocular reading speed while light input and no light input did not. These results support the hypothesis that patterned input in the non-reading eye would most negatively affect reading speed as reading involves the interpretation of patterned information.

Duponsel, N. Overbury, O. (2005). The effect of ocular dominance and interocular rivalry on monocular reading speed under near-normal, ganzfeld, and complete occlusion conditions [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 5(8):11, 11a, http://journalofvision.org/5/8/11/, doi:10.1167/5.8.11. [CrossRef]
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