September 2005
Volume 5, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2005
Is holistic perception of faces specific to our own-race ?
Author Affiliations
  • Caroline Michel
    Cognition & Development Research Unit, University of Louvain, Belgium
  • Roberto Caldara
    Department of Psychology, University of Glasgow, UK
  • Jaehyun Han
    Center for Cognitive Science, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
  • Chan-Sup Chung
    Center for Cognitive Science, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
  • Bruno Rossion
    Cognition & Development Research Unit, University of Louvain, Belgium
Journal of Vision September 2005, Vol.5, 539. doi:10.1167/5.8.539
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Caroline Michel, Roberto Caldara, Jaehyun Han, Chan-Sup Chung, Bruno Rossion; Is holistic perception of faces specific to our own-race ?. Journal of Vision 2005;5(8):539. doi: 10.1167/5.8.539.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Humans are experts at recognizing faces across a wide range of viewing conditions. A notable exception to this rule is that of recognizing faces of a different race, for which subjects perform poorly (the so-called ‘other-race effect’). In order to understand this phenomenon, it is critical to clarify whether same- and other-race faces processing differs qualitatively. Here, we tested the hypothesis that same-race faces are perceived more holistically than other-race faces. Thirty Caucasian and 30 Asian participants without life experience among other-race faces and presenting a large other-race effect - as measured in an old/new recognition task - took part in the experiment. The differential holistic processing hypothesis was tested by measuring, on same- and other-race faces, the extent to which the recognition of the upper part of a ‘composite face’ was disrupted by the - to be ignored - lower part of the face (the ‘composite effect’, Young, Hellawell, & Hay, 1987). Both Caucasian and Asian participants showed a larger composite effect for same- relative to other-race faces, supporting the view that same-race faces are processed more holistically than other-race faces. In conclusion, same and other-race face processing differs qualitatively, the relationships between features being extracted more efficiently from same-race faces, most likely as a by-product of visual experience.

Michel, C. Caldara, R. Han, J. Chung, C.-S. Rossion, B. (2005). Is holistic perception of faces specific to our own-race ? [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 5(8):539, 539a, http://journalofvision.org/5/8/539/, doi:10.1167/5.8.539. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×