September 2005
Volume 5, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2005
The role of eye movements in bistability from perceptual and binocular rivalry and the role of voluntary control
Author Affiliations
  • Loes C. J. van Dam
    Utrecht University, Helmholtz Institute, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC, Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Raymond van Ee
    Utrecht University, Helmholtz Institute, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC, Utrecht, the Netherlands
Journal of Vision September 2005, Vol.5, 704. doi:10.1167/5.8.704
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Loes C. J. van Dam, Raymond van Ee; The role of eye movements in bistability from perceptual and binocular rivalry and the role of voluntary control. Journal of Vision 2005;5(8):704. doi: 10.1167/5.8.704.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

We exposed the visual system to four different stimuli that can induce bistable perception. The bistability paradigms that we used were slant rivalry, Necker cube rivalry, grating rivalry and house-face rivalry. For each of these stimuli we investigated the role of eye movements for perceptual alternations from one to the other representation. We compared results when subjects were trying to hold one of the two percepts with results when subjects did not try to actively influence the percept (natural viewing condition). The results show that, for each paradigm, saccades are suppressed just after a perceptual alternation occurs in the natural viewing condition. For slant rivalry, there is no positive correlation between saccades and a perceptual alternation before the perceptual alternation. For Necker cube rivalry and binocular grating rivalry, saccades sometimes occur before the perceptual alternation, but this positive correlation is relatively small. For house-face rivalry the positive correlation between saccades and perceptual alternations before the alternations is more pronounced. When subjects are trying to hold a percept any correlation between saccades and perceptual alternations is reduced. Average gaze positions and average horizontal vergence do not change at the time of a flip for all stimuli in all viewing conditions. However different voluntary control conditions can lead to different average fixation positions or a wider scatter of fixations. We conclude that generally eye movements are not necessary to exert voluntary perceptual control.

van Dam, L. C. van Ee, R. (2005). The role of eye movements in bistability from perceptual and binocular rivalry and the role of voluntary control [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 5(8):704, 704a, http://journalofvision.org/5/8/704/, doi:10.1167/5.8.704. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×