September 2005
Volume 5, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2005
Training-induced improvements of visual motion perception after V1 cortical damage in humans
Author Affiliations
  • Krystel R. Huxlin
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Rochester, and Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester
  • Jennifer Williams
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Rochester
  • Brian Sullivan
    Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
  • Mary Hayhoe
    Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, and Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester
Journal of Vision September 2005, Vol.5, 708. doi:10.1167/5.8.708
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Krystel R. Huxlin, Jennifer Williams, Brian Sullivan, Mary Hayhoe; Training-induced improvements of visual motion perception after V1 cortical damage in humans. Journal of Vision 2005;5(8):708. doi: 10.1167/5.8.708.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Damage to the adult primary visual cortex (V1) causes largely permanent visual impairment. Visual motion perception is one of the main visual perceptual abilities affected by V1 lesions, yet it is critical for navigation and multiple other levels of interaction with our dynamic environment. Recent pilot studies on cats with damage to early visual cortex suggest that intensive visual discrimination training in the blind field can induce a localized recovery of motion thresholds. To assess whether improvements in visual motion perception can be elicited in adult humans with V1 damage, three patients were recruited one year after a stroke that induced homonymous visual field defects. They were taught to self-administer a two-alternative, forced-choice, global direction discrimination task within their blind fields. On a daily basis, they performed 300 trials of this task using random-dot stimuli that are optimally processed in higher-level visual areas such as the MT+ complex, which was intact in these patients. Slow but significant recovery of global motion sensitivity was observed that was highly specific to the visual field location(s) retrained. With discrimination retraining, all patients progressed from no conscious perception of the random dot stimulus and severely abnormal discrimination thresholds to conscious perception and near-normal thresholds at the retrained location(s). Patients also demonstrated enlargements of the usable field of vision using Humphrey perimetry and improved ability to detect and track moving objects in a realistic virtual environment. Thus, intensive direction discrimination retraining with dynamic random dot stimuli in portions of the blind field improves visual motion perception after V1 damage in adult humans. Whether this recovery is mediated by spared primary visual cortex, extra-geniculostriate pathways or training-induced re-organization of intact, higher level visual cortical areas remains to be determined.

Huxlin, K. R. Williams, J. Sullivan, B. Hayhoe, M. (2005). Training-induced improvements of visual motion perception after V1 cortical damage in humans [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 5(8):708, 708a, http://journalofvision.org/5/8/708/, doi:10.1167/5.8.708. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 RPB, NIH grants EY05729 and RR09283
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×