September 2005
Volume 5, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2005
The contribution of binocular and monocular texture elements to depth ordering
Author Affiliations
  • Laurie M. Wilcox
    Centre for Vision Research, Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto
  • Richard P. Wildes
    Centre for Vision Research, Department of Computer Science, York University, Toronto
  • Deepak Lakra
    Centre for Vision Research, Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto
  • Rorrie A. Spengler
    Centre for Vision Research, Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto
Journal of Vision September 2005, Vol.5, 772. doi:10.1167/5.8.772
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Laurie M. Wilcox, Richard P. Wildes, Deepak Lakra, Rorrie A. Spengler; The contribution of binocular and monocular texture elements to depth ordering. Journal of Vision 2005;5(8):772. doi: 10.1167/5.8.772.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

While once considered simply a source of noise in binocular images, recent experiments show that monocularly visible elements that are consistent with the sign of a depth discontinuity improve depth perception (Gillam & Borsting, Perception,1988; Nakayama & Shimojo, VR,1989). This improvement is evident in simple (Pianta & Gillam, VR, 2002) and complex (Wilcox et al.JOV suppl, 2003) stereoscopic displays. However, we do not know how this monocular signal is combined with other cues. To this end, the experiments described here evaluate the relative contribution of monocular elements and disparity to depth perception. We used random dot stereograms and a 2AFC paradigm to assess the contribution of monocular elements and disparity to ordinal depth judgments. Experiments 1 and 2 used suprathreshold stimuli and demonstrated that when monocular elements alone signalled a discontinuity depth perception was poorer than in conditions where disparity was presented alone or conflicted with the monocular cue. We posited that the monocular signal is used when disparity is unreliable. In Experiment 3 we measured the minimum amount of contrast needed to see depth via disparity and then measured percent correct in a depth ordering task at threshold and at 1.5 times threshold. At threshold, performance was the same in the monocular and the disparity alone conditions. When contrast was increased slightly, performance improved in the monocular conditions (with or without disparity) relative to the disparity only condition. We conclude that if a reliable disparity signal is present it will be used to make depth ordering judgments; the presence or absence of a valid monocular signal does not influence performance. However, if the disparity signal is weak, then the monocular information is exploited to make depth judgments. Significantly, we have found no evidence of summation of disparity and monocular signals suggesting that this process cannot be modeled as a weighted average of the two cues.

Wilcox, L. M. Wildes, R. P. Lakra, D. Spengler, R. A. (2005). The contribution of binocular and monocular texture elements to depth ordering [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 5(8):772, 772a, http://journalofvision.org/5/8/772/, doi:10.1167/5.8.772. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 This work was in part supported by an NSERC grant to LW and a CIHR traing grant to RS
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×