September 2005
Volume 5, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2005
Cortical evaluation of a rule-based trajectory revealed by fMRI
Author Affiliations
  • Stephen J. Heinen
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco CA
  • Jess Rowland
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco CA
  • Anca Velisar
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco CA
  • Alex R. Wade
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco CA
Journal of Vision September 2005, Vol.5, 845. doi:10.1167/5.8.845
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Stephen J. Heinen, Jess Rowland, Anca Velisar, Alex R. Wade; Cortical evaluation of a rule-based trajectory revealed by fMRI. Journal of Vision 2005;5(8):845. doi: 10.1167/5.8.845.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Kim and Heinen (2001) introduced a novel paradigm for investigating rule-based eye movements in awake, behaving monkeys. The rule in their “baseball” task was to follow a target with eye movements if it crossed a visible “strike zone”, and withhold eye movements if it did not. Neurons were recorded in the supplementary eye fields (SEF) that signaled early whether the target would cross the strike zone or not. Here, using fMRI, we show neural correlates of trajectory evaluation in humans. Three observers signaled with a key press whether or not a target's trajectory would cross a strike zone. Subjects were scanned on a 3T GE Signa system with 23 functional slices covering the entire head at a resolution of 3×3×5mm and a TR of 3s. Spiral k-space acquisition was used to reduce susceptibility artifacts in anterior cortical regions. Regions whose activity covaried with the psychophysically-determined difficulty of the baseball task were identified based on a signal coherence analysis. Three areas showed significant, consistent activity during the task. One, the inferior parietal sulcus (IPS), is a region implicated in spatial processing and attention, and in integrating motion signals. Two frontal areas were also active: right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus close to or within ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). Right hemisphere DLPFC has been previously implicated in spatial working memory and rule evaluation. The VLPFC has been suggested to play a role in short-term storage of visual images. Our results suggest that these areas are involved in interpreting the trajectory of a moving stimulus, and using this information to guide behavior in the context of a rule. These regions may in turn send this information to the SEF if eye movements are required. This study represents a first step in humans of elucidating the network involved in interpreting the trajectory of a moving target within the context of a rule.

Heinen, S. J. Rowland, J. Velisar, A. Wade, A. R. (2005). Cortical evaluation of a rule-based trajectory revealed by fMRI [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 5(8):845, 845a, http://journalofvision.org/5/8/845/, doi:10.1167/5.8.845. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 Supported by EY11720
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×