June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Apparent motion speed dependence on contrast and orientation: Evidence from MEG
Author Affiliations
  • Jean Lorenceau
    LENA CNRS, 47 bd de l'Hopital, Paris, France
  • Shasha Morel
    LENA CNRS, 47 bd de l'Hopital, Paris, France
  • Anne Caclin
    LENA CNRS, 47 bd de l'Hopital, Paris, France
  • Catherine Tallon-Baudry
    LENA CNRS, 47 bd de l'Hopital, Paris, France
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 112. doi:10.1167/6.6.112
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jean Lorenceau, Shasha Morel, Anne Caclin, Catherine Tallon-Baudry; Apparent motion speed dependence on contrast and orientation: Evidence from MEG. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):112. doi: 10.1167/6.6.112.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The perceived speed of fast (>40°/s.) apparent motion of a Gabor patch whose orientation is aligned with the motion axis is much faster than when it is orthogonal to it. Electrophysiological recordings in cat and modeling (Lorenceau & al., 2002) suggest that this perceptual bias is explained by the phase advance in the firing of V1 neurons resulting from synaptic summation of horizontal and feed-forward inputs, whose responses are read-out by MT speed selective cells.

Using the same paradigm in humans, we present additional psychophysical and MEG experiments showing that: 1. At high physical speeds, perceived speed is faster at low (20%) than at high (50%) Gabor contrast, a result at odd with previous reports of lower perceived speed at low contrasts (Thompson, 1982). 2. MEG data show that: i. the latencies of the first peak responses (∼90 ms.) are longer (by ∼20 ms.) at low as compared to high contrast. At these latencies, response amplitude is independent of Gabor orientation; ii. At longer latencies (∼160 ms.) and low stimulus contrast, the peak response amplitude is larger for a Gabor aligned to the motion axis than for a Gabor orthogonal to it, an effect not seen at high contrast.

As predicted by our model, perceived speed of fast apparent motion sequences is biased in a contrast dependent way by the orientation of a target relative to its motion path, a finding well correlated to the recorded MEG activity.

Lorenceau, J. Morel, S. Caclin, A. Tallon-Baudry, C. (2006). Apparent motion speed dependence on contrast and orientation: Evidence from MEG [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):112, 112a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/112/, doi:10.1167/6.6.112. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×