June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Auditory-visual interactions in the judgment of a ball's speed
Author Affiliations
  • Laurie M. Heller
    Dept. of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Brown University
  • Suzanne Gilman
    Dept. of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Brown University
  • Karen Sripada
    Dept. of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Brown University
  • Elena Helman
    Dept. of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Brown University
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 174. doi:10.1167/6.6.174
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      Laurie M. Heller, Suzanne Gilman, Karen Sripada, Elena Helman; Auditory-visual interactions in the judgment of a ball's speed. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):174. doi: 10.1167/6.6.174.

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Abstract

Audition and vision both contribute to the perception of an event, and when the auditory stimulus is rich, auditory information can exert a powerful influence on multimodal perception. Previous research (Ecker and Heller, Perception 2005) found that auditory information which indicates rolling surface contact can strongly influence whether or not a visually displayed ball is perceived as rolling. In the experiments to be presented here, a quantitative approach was taken to assess the relative contribution of audition and vision on the perceived speed of a rolling ball. A video of a ball rolling in depth was paired with the sound of a ball rolling. In a 2IFC comparison, observers indicated which ball seemed faster. When the near-threshold visual and auditory speed information was consistent, performance improved as much as would be predicted by a linear model. On the other half of the trials in which the auditory and visual information were inconsistent, performance declined accordingly. Results are compared with a straightforward model of the optimal linear combination of information from independent channels in which we assume that the combination of auditory and visual information is obligatory.

Heller, L. M. Gilman, S. Sripada, K. Helman, E. (2006). Auditory-visual interactions in the judgment of a ball's speed [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):174, 174a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/174/, doi:10.1167/6.6.174. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 Supported by NSF BCS-0446955
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