June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Perception and action at a distance
Author Affiliations
  • Flip Phillips
    Skidmore College, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience Program
  • Brian Gaudino
    Skidmore College, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience Program
  • Brian Prue
    Skidmore College, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience Program
  • Martin G. Voshell
    The Ohio State University, Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 353. doi:10.1167/6.6.353
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      Flip Phillips, Brian Gaudino, Brian Prue, Martin G. Voshell; Perception and action at a distance. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):353. doi: 10.1167/6.6.353.

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Abstract

Teleoperation of robots and autonomous vehicles introduces an interesting series of questions with respect to perception and action at a distance. While the pragmatics of this problem has been considered in the human factors domain, there is little consideration of an overall theory of perception and action at a distance in the perceptual domain. Our work attempts to erect a scaffolding for the development of such a theory. Classically, studies of perception and action take place in the 1st-person, i.e., those where the embodiment of the perceiver and actor are the same entity. Our work considers the 2nd- and 3rd-person perspectives (e.g., watching a machine carrying out our action and watching from the machine carrying out the action). The framework is complicated by the fact that 2nd- and 3rd-person embodiments may have different action capabilities than the 1st-person, and 3rd-person embodiments may have additional sensor mechanisms able to provide information not available in the usual 1st-person sense. Our overall strategy consists of 2nd- and 3rd-person replication of classic 1st-person perception-action paradigms and investigation the resulting shifts (or lack thereof) in performance. Obviously some types of performance will have little or no difference when differently-embodied while others should experience significant modification. From these results, we can model and predict expected performance in alternative perception-action embodiments. Here, we present initial results from an affordance-based experiment modeled on Warren & Wang (1987) as well as navigation experiments after Foo et al. (2005), along with their relevant implications for our proposed theoretical framework.

Phillips, F. Gaudino, B. Prue, B. Voshell, M. G. (2006). Perception and action at a distance [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):353, 353a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/353/, doi:10.1167/6.6.353. [CrossRef]
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