June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Auditory-motor delay adaptation modulates subjective simultaneity of visually observed other's action and auditory stimuli
Author Affiliations
  • Masataka Watanabe
    Dept. of Quantum Eng. and Systems Science, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo
  • Shion Shinohara
    Dept. of Quantum Eng. and Systems Science, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo
  • Shinsuke Shimojo
    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, and NTT Communication Science Laboratories, NTT Corporation
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 386. doi:10.1167/6.6.386
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      Masataka Watanabe, Shion Shinohara, Shinsuke Shimojo; Auditory-motor delay adaptation modulates subjective simultaneity of visually observed other's action and auditory stimuli. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):386. doi: 10.1167/6.6.386.

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Abstract

Prolonged exposure to biased sensorimotor relationship leads to recalibration of the two modalities, spatially (Welch 1978) and/or temporally (Cunningham et al. 2001). We question if personal sensorimotor adaptation modulates the perception of others performing identical motor actions with sensory feedback.

The experiment consisted of three phases: pretest, adaptation and post-test. In the adaptation phase, subjects were exposed to temporal misalignment of auditory stimulus and arm motion. Subjects moved a computer mouse horizontally while a delayed (150ms) “click” sound was delivered whenever the mouse ceased to move. We instructed the subjects to temporally align the “click” to a metronome “beep”. Only a fixation spot was displayed on the monitor and the subject's arm was screened to eliminate possible auditory-visual adaptation.

For the test of adaptation, we examined three types of subjective simultaneity on an event basis without the use of a metronome. In the “self” test, the participants judged the simultaneity of self mouse stoppage and a “click” sound. In the “other” test, the participants viewed the experimenter maneuvering the mouse and judged the simultaneity of mouse stoppage and a “click”. Finally for control, we tested the subjective simultaneity of a simple visual flash and a “click”.

The psychophysical results indicated statistically significant shifts in subjective simultaneity toward the lag of auditory stimulus for both the “self” test (+72 ms) and the “other” test (+35 ms), but not for control. Our results suggest possible involvement of the mirror system in projecting personal sensorimotor recalibration to observation of other's action.

Watanabe, M. Shinohara, S. Shimojo, S. (2006). Auditory-motor delay adaptation modulates subjective simultaneity of visually observed other's action and auditory stimuli [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):386, 386a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/386/, doi:10.1167/6.6.386. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 M.W. is supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas -Higher-Order Brain Functions- from The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (17022015)
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