June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Asymmetric responses to temporal versus nasal hemifield stimulation in the human superior colliculus
Author Affiliations
  • Richard Sylvester
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London
  • John Dylan Haynes
    Max-Planck-Institute, Leipzig
  • Jon Driver
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London
  • Geraint Rees
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 506. doi:10.1167/6.6.506
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Richard Sylvester, John Dylan Haynes, Jon Driver, Geraint Rees; Asymmetric responses to temporal versus nasal hemifield stimulation in the human superior colliculus. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):506. doi: 10.1167/6.6.506.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Normal subjects show a temporal hemifield advantage in visual orientating tasks, with a reduction in saccade latency when orienting to cues presented in the temporal (versus nasal) hemifield. Hemianopic patients with geniculostriate lesions show this effect for cues presented in their blind field, while newborns (who have yet to develop functioning geniculostriate pathways) show an exaggerated effect. These lines of evidence suggest that the temporal hemifield advantage is mediated via extrageniculate pathways, specifically the retinotectal pathway involving the superior colliculus. We therefore examined temporal/nasal field asymmetries in the human visual system using fMRI at high spatial resolution (voxel size - 1.5mm3) accompanied by conventional retinotopic mapping in eight right-eye dominant subjects who viewed monocular checkerboard stimuli. The superior colliculi consistently showed significantly greater activity for temporal compared to nasal field stimulation, while LGN and V1 showed no temporal/nasal asymmetry. This provides direct evidence that the extrageniculate pathway in humans has a bias towards the temporal visual field, and may represent the neural basis for the temporal field advantage seen in visual orientating tasks.

Sylvester, R. Haynes, J. D. Driver, J. Rees, G. (2006). Asymmetric responses to temporal versus nasal hemifield stimulation in the human superior colliculus [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):506, 506a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/506/, doi:10.1167/6.6.506. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×