June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Chromatic differences within surfaces and across surface boundaries
Author Affiliations
  • J. Anthony Wilson
    Center for Perceptual Systems and Psychology, University of Texas, Austin TX 78712, and Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA 19104
  • A. David Ing
    Center for Perceptual Systems and Psychology, University of Texas, Austin TX 78712
  • Wilson S. Geisler
    Center for Perceptual Systems and Psychology, University of Texas, Austin TX 78712
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 559. doi:10.1167/6.6.559
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      J. Anthony Wilson, A. David Ing, Wilson S. Geisler; Chromatic differences within surfaces and across surface boundaries. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):559. doi: 10.1167/6.6.559.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Humans tend to group nearby image patches that are similar in color and segregate nearby image patches that are dissimilar in color. However, little is known about the predictive power of this chromatic information in natural scenes. Thus, we have analyzed close up images of foliage obtained with a calibrated 36-bit camera, which provides estimates of the relative L, M and S cone responses with error SDs of 0.15%, 0.1% and 1%, respectively, for natural spectra. More than 2000 leaves were hand segmented from over 60 images representing a wide range of foliage. Image patches were sampled from each leaf object. For each patch, other patches were sampled within and outside the leaf. The cone responses for each patch were transformed into a logarithmic space (Ruderman et al. JOSA A, 15, 2036). Probability distributions for response differences (based on all objects) were estimated, conditional on distance between patches and on whether or not patches fall within the same leaf. The grouping/segregation information was quantified for each patch size and distance by the signal-to-noise ratio (d') for deciding whether or not a pair of patches was drawn from the same leaf. For small patches, d' fell from values greater than 2.0 at smaller distances to values near 1.0 at larger distances. Thus, for foliage (a large fraction of the natural world) there is substantial chromatic information for region grouping. Further, the decline in d' with distance suggests that region grouping would benefit from a chromatic region-growing mechanism.

Wilson, J. A. Ing, A. D. Geisler, W. S. (2006). Chromatic differences within surfaces and across surface boundaries [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):559, 559a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/559/, doi:10.1167/6.6.559. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 Supported by NIH grant EY11247.
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×