June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Ecological validity determines the impact of second-order information on perceptual performance
Author Affiliations
  • Aaron P. Johnson
    McGill Vision Research Unit, Dept. Opthalmology, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  • Nicolaas Prins
    Dept. Psychology, University of Mississippi, Oxford, Mississippi, USA.
  • Frederick A. A. Kingdom
    McGill Vision Research Unit, Dept. Opthalmology, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  • Curtis L. Baker, Jr.
    McGill Vision Research Unit, Dept. Opthalmology, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 568. doi:10.1167/6.6.568
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Aaron P. Johnson, Nicolaas Prins, Frederick A. A. Kingdom, Curtis L. Baker, Jr.; Ecological validity determines the impact of second-order information on perceptual performance. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):568. doi: 10.1167/6.6.568.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The human visual system is sensitive to modulations in the first-order (luminance) and second-order (contrast and texture) information within the natural world. Although there is psychophysical and neurophysiological evidence that first- and second-order information are processed separately by the visual system, the two are strongly correlated within the natural world (Johnson & Baker, 2004). Here we investigated whether first- and second-order information interact in determining perception, and if so whether the interaction is dependent on their spatial correlation. Using micropattern texture stimuli with a sine-wave modulation of element orientation (2–4 cycles/image), subjects performed a 2AFC spatial frequency discrimination task. Micropattern textures were comprised of either first-order only (Gaussians), second-order only (Gabors or contrast-modulated noise), or first- and second-order micropatterns whose spatial correlation was varied from 0% to 100%. Subjects exhibited good performance using only first-order micropatterns, but they could not perform the task in the second-order only condition. However when second-order micropatterns were presented together with first-order information, the results depended on their spatial correlation: task performance was augmented maximally when their spatial correlation was 75% or more, and fell back to levels below first-order only information as correlation declined to anti-correlation conditions (0%). This result suggests that while humans are capable of performing the discrimination task with only first-order information, perceptual performance is augmented by the presence of second-order cues, but only when presented in ecologically valid combinations.

Johnson, A. P. Prins, N. Kingdom, F. A. A. Baker, C.L.Jr. (2006). Ecological validity determines the impact of second-order information on perceptual performance [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):568, 568a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/568/, doi:10.1167/6.6.568. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 Funded by an NSERC grant to CLB (OPG0001978).
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×