June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Voice recognition in a prosopagnosic patient: An fMRI study
Author Affiliations
  • Stephen R. Arnott
    Department of Psychology, The University of Western Ontario
  • Robert W. Kentridge
    Department of Psychology, University of Durham
  • Charles A. Heywood
    Department of Psychology, University of Durham
  • Jennifer K. E. Steeves
    Department of Psychology, Atkinson College, York University
  • Melvyn A. Goodale
    Department of Psychology, The University of Western Ontario
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 658. doi:10.1167/6.6.658
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Stephen R. Arnott, Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood, Jennifer K. E. Steeves, Melvyn A. Goodale; Voice recognition in a prosopagnosic patient: An fMRI study. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):658. doi: 10.1167/6.6.658.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Voices, in addition to faces, enable person identification. In particular, voice recognition has been shown to evoke a distributed network of brain regions that includes, amongst others, the fusiform face area (FFA) and the anterior temporal lobe. In the present fMRI study, we examined fMRI brain activation in a prosopagnosic patient M.S. who, despite extensive late-onset damage to these two areas, nevertheless retains the ability to recognize people based only on their voice. Relative to speech-modulated noise, familiar and unfamiliar voices elicited enhanced hemodynamic activity in the posterior portion of the left superior temporal gyrus, as well as the left planum temporale (pT) and posterior cingulate gyrus (pCG). Region-of-interest analyses on those areas revealed that pT and pCG activity was greater for voices rated as familiar as opposed to unfamiliar. Results are consistent with the notion that an intact FFA is not essential for voice recognition. Instead, the activation seen in this face-sensitive region during voice recognition tasks in healthy subjects may reflect some form of implicit face imagery.

Arnott, S. R. Kentridge, R. W. Heywood, C. A. Steeves, J. K. E. Goodale, M. A. (2006). Voice recognition in a prosopagnosic patient: An fMRI study [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):658, 658a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/658/, doi:10.1167/6.6.658. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 This work was supported by Canadian Institutes of Health Research grants to S.R.A. and M.A.G.
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×