June 2006
Volume 6, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2006
Bridging the gap between monkey and man: Macaque event-related potentials reveal similarities to human indices of visual attention
Author Affiliations
  • Geoffrey F. Woodman
    Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Vanderbilt Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Min-Suk Kang
    Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Vanderbilt Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Andrew F. Rossi
    Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Vanderbilt Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Jeffrey D. Schall
    Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Vanderbilt Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience
Journal of Vision June 2006, Vol.6, 824. doi:10.1167/6.6.824
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      Geoffrey F. Woodman, Min-Suk Kang, Andrew F. Rossi, Jeffrey D. Schall; Bridging the gap between monkey and man: Macaque event-related potentials reveal similarities to human indices of visual attention. Journal of Vision 2006;6(6):824. doi: 10.1167/6.6.824.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Nearly a half-century's worth of research has established the existence of a number of human event-related potential (ERP) components that measure a host of different operation during visual cognition. Surprisingly, almost nothing is known about whether nonhuman primates exhibit such electrophysiological signatures of cognition. We report findings from a new technique for recording ERPs from macaque monkeys. During visual search monkeys exhibit ERP components corresponding to those described in human studies. These include several early visual components sensitive to sensory processing demands and attention-directing lateralizations similar to the human N2pc. These findings serve to bridge the gap between the disparate literatures using electrophysiological measurements to study visual processing in the brains of humans and nonhuman primates.

Woodman, G. F. Kang, M. S. Rossi, A. F. Schall, J. D. (2006). Bridging the gap between monkey and man: Macaque event-related potentials reveal similarities to human indices of visual attention [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(6):824, 824a, http://journalofvision.org/6/6/824/, doi:10.1167/6.6.824. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 We thank NEI (for F32-EY015043 to GFW) and Vanderbilt University for a Discovery Research Grant to AFR and GFW. This research was also supported by by Robin and Richard Patton and grants RO1-EY08890, P30-EY08126, P30-HD015052 to JDS.
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