December 2006
Volume 6, Issue 13
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2006
Highly redundant population coding explains the representation of spatial frequency information in primary visual cortex
Author Affiliations
  • Charles H. Anderson
    Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Gregory C. DeAngelis
    Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine
  • J. Anthony Movshon
    Center for Neural Science, New York University
Journal of Vision December 2006, Vol.6, 41. doi:10.1167/6.13.41
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      Charles H. Anderson, Gregory C. DeAngelis, J. Anthony Movshon; Highly redundant population coding explains the representation of spatial frequency information in primary visual cortex. Journal of Vision 2006;6(13):41. doi: 10.1167/6.13.41.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Information is typically represented in sensory systems by populations of neurons, each of which is selective to a particular range of stimulus space. A fundamental question is what determines how many neurons are allocated to encode the behaviorally relevant information. To address this question, it is shown in this paper that the number of neurons that respond with the same preferred spatial frequency (SF) in V1 is proportional to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) at that SF as conveyed from the retina by the ganglion cells. This quantitatively demonstrates that both ganglion and V1 cortical neurons encode visual information with highly redundant population codes, which is consistent with the idea neurobiological systems achieve high SNR functionality and robustness by pooling over many low SNR neurons. These redundant codes are consistent with experiments demonstrating effects on perception through stimulating the cortex and underlie all neuroprothesis research, but they are not consistent with some of the prevalent theories of optimality in neuronal coding.

Anderson, C. H. DeAngelis, G. C. Movshon, J. A. (2006). Highly redundant population coding explains the representation of spatial frequency information in primary visual cortex [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 6(13):41, 41a, http://journalofvision.org/6/13/41/, doi:10.1167/6.13.41. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 Supported by the Mathers Foundation and the McDonnell Center for Higher Brain Function
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