June 2007
Volume 7, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2007
fMRI-adaptation for articulated moving objects in ventral temporal brain areas
Author Affiliations
  • John Pyles
    Department of Cognitive Sciences, University of California, Irvine
  • Javier Garcia
    Department of Cognitive Sciences, University of California, Irvine
  • Emily Grossman
    Department of Cognitive Sciences, University of California, Irvine
Journal of Vision June 2007, Vol.7, 1034. doi:10.1167/7.9.1034
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      John Pyles, Javier Garcia, Emily Grossman; fMRI-adaptation for articulated moving objects in ventral temporal brain areas. Journal of Vision 2007;7(9):1034. doi: 10.1167/7.9.1034.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: We live in a world amidst complex, moving, articulated objects (such as bodies and machines). While a number of neuroimaging studies have clearly identified object selective brain responses in ventral temporal cortex (e.g. Grill-Spector, 2001), it remains unclear how dynamic objects are represented in these brain areas. These experiments investigate the neural representation of complex, articulating objects, both in motion and while stationary. Method: Two rapid event-related fMRI adaptation experiments compared neural responses to moving and static novel, articulating objects (‘Creatures’; Pyles et al. 2005). Observers viewed 2 sec animations of novel locomoting objects with articulating parts; static stimuli were generated from still frames taken from the same animations. Trials consisted of paired movies or images, respectively, in the two experiments. The pairs were either: 1) identical, 2) different exemplars of the same object (i.e. in a different position and view), or 3) different objects. In each experiment, trials of a given condition were averaged together to compare the peak BOLD responses in object selective brain areas. Results: Replicating a number of previous reports, viewing repeated, identical static objects results in maximal fMR-adaptation in a number of object selective brain areas, including regions of the LOC. Viewing repeated, identical animations also yields maximal fMR-adaptation in those same brain regions. Additionally, some brain areas reveal fMR-adaptation for the ‘different exemplar’ condition (both moving and static), however this finding is variable across brain areas. Regions displaying fMR-adaptation are intermixed among others lacking adaptation, suggesting a patchy organization. Conclusions: Adaptation effects for static and animated objects in ventral temporal cortex is evidence for insensitivity to the configural changes of articulating objects over time.

Pyles, J. Garcia, J. Grossman, E. (2007). fMRI-adaptation for articulated moving objects in ventral temporal brain areas [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 7(9):1034, 1034a, http://journalofvision.org/7/9/1034/, doi:10.1167/7.9.1034. [CrossRef]
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