June 2007
Volume 7, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2007
Neural correlates of perceptual filling-in of an artificial scotoma in humans
Author Affiliations
  • Rimona Weil
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London
  • James Kilner
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London
  • John-Dylan Haynes
    Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig
  • Geraint Rees
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London
Journal of Vision June 2007, Vol.7, 279. doi:10.1167/7.9.279
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      Rimona Weil, James Kilner, John-Dylan Haynes, Geraint Rees; Neural correlates of perceptual filling-in of an artificial scotoma in humans. Journal of Vision 2007;7(9):279. doi: 10.1167/7.9.279.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

When a uniformly illuminated surface is placed eccentrically on a dynamic textured background, after a few seconds it is perceived to disappear and is replaced by the background texture. Such texture filling-in is thought to occur in retinotopic visual cortex, but it has proven difficult to distinguish the contributions of invisible target and visible background to signals measured in these areas. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure time-dependent brain responses in human observers experiencing texture completion. We measured responses specifically associated with the filled-in target, by isolating neural population signals entrained at the frequency of flicker of the target. When perceptual completion occurred and the target became invisible, there was significant reduction in the MEG power at the target frequency over contralateral posterior sensors. However, even a subjectively invisible target nevertheless evoked frequency-specific signals compared to a no-target baseline. These data represent evidence for a persistent target-specific representation even for stimuli rendered invisible due to perceptual filling-in.

Weil, R. Kilner, J. Haynes, J.-D. Rees, G. (2007). Neural correlates of perceptual filling-in of an artificial scotoma in humans [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 7(9):279, 279a, http://journalofvision.org/7/9/279/, doi:10.1167/7.9.279. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 This work was supported by the Medical Research Council (RW) and the Wellcome Trust (GR, JDH, JK).
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