June 2007
Volume 7, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2007
Teasing apart contributions of visual experience and biological maturation on the development of contrast sensitivity
Author Affiliations
  • Karen Dobkins
    Dept of Psychology, University of California, San Diego
  • Rain Bosworth
    Dept of Psychology, University of California, San Diego
  • Joseph McCleery
    Dept of Psychology, University of California, San Diego
Journal of Vision June 2007, Vol.7, 545. doi:10.1167/7.9.545
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Karen Dobkins, Rain Bosworth, Joseph McCleery; Teasing apart contributions of visual experience and biological maturation on the development of contrast sensitivity. Journal of Vision 2007;7(9):545. doi: 10.1167/7.9.545.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the extent to which early visual development is governed by visual experience vs. biological maturation, we asked whether contrast sensitivity (CS) for luminance and chromatic stimuli is better predicted by postnatal age (PNA) or biological age (BA, time since conception), the latter calculated as the sum of PN and gestational period (GP).

Methods: Using FPL, we measured CS in full-term 2-month-olds (n=44) and 6-month-olds (n=130) to chromatic (isoluminant, red/green) and luminance gratings (0.27 cpd, 4.2 Hz). GP was calculated by comparing subjects' irthdates with due dates, accounting for the known error in ultrasound dating (Sladkevicius et al 2005). To tease apart factors contributing to CS, we employed a multiple regression analysis to determine percent variance (r-squared) in CS accounted for by PNA and GP jointly vs. each factor alone.

Results: GP was not a significant predictor of either chromatic or luminance CS (0%; p=NS) in 6 month olds, while in 2-month-olds, it predicted 5% of the variance in both chromatic and luminance CS (p∼0.09). PNA predicted a similar amount of variance, 7% and 9% (both p&lt'0.002) for chromatic and luminance CS, respectively, in 6 month olds, while in 2-month-olds, it predicted 18% of the variance in chromatic CS (p=0.003), but only 1% in luminance CS (p=NS). Jointly, GP and PNA (which reflect BA), in 2-month-olds, predicted 24% of the variance in chromatic CS, which was greater than either GP or PNA alone. This was not the case in 6-month-olds, since GP did not account for any variance.

Conclusions: Early in development, chromatic CS is influenced by visual experience, while luminance CS is dominated by biological maturation. At older ages, only visual experience influences, and roughly equally so, chromatic and luminance CS. This suggests that, with age, effects of biological maturation decrease and effects of visual experience increase.

Dobkins, K. Bosworth, R. McCleery, J. (2007). Teasing apart contributions of visual experience and biological maturation on the development of contrast sensitivity [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 7(9):545, 545a, http://journalofvision.org/7/9/545/, doi:10.1167/7.9.545.
Footnotes
 NIH/NEI R01-EY12153-06 (KRD)
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×