June 2007
Volume 7, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2007
Cognitive rehabilitation of patients with hemispatial neglect: Effects of vigilance training on components of attentional processing
Author Affiliations
  • Thomas Van Vleet
    Department of Veteran Affairs, Martinez VA., and University of California, Berkeley
  • Joseph DeGutis
    Department of Veteran Affairs, Martinez VA, and University of California, Berkeley
  • Lynn Robertson
    Department of Veteran Affairs, Martinez VA, and University of California, Berkeley
Journal of Vision June 2007, Vol.7, 701. doi:10.1167/7.9.701
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      Thomas Van Vleet, Joseph DeGutis, Lynn Robertson; Cognitive rehabilitation of patients with hemispatial neglect: Effects of vigilance training on components of attentional processing. Journal of Vision 2007;7(9):701. doi: 10.1167/7.9.701.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Currently there exists no generalizable, long-lasting treatment for the debilitating spatial and non-spatial deficits exhibited in patients with chronic neglect. While several experimental interventions have been developed (e.g., optokinetic stimulation, self-cueing, sustained attention training), the effects of these interventions on components of attentional processing is not well understood. In the current study we developed a novel non-spatial vigilance training intervention and assessed improvements on psychophysical measures of spatial search, object-based attention, sustained attention, and selective attention. The vigilance intervention consisted of training patients to detect a target scene in a continuous stream of distracter scenes presented at fixation. Patients were required to continually make responses to all but the target scene during 3 12-minute blocks. Patients demonstrated improved discriminability (d') and decreased reaction time over the course of 10-training sessions (2 weeks). Post-training assessment revealed significant improvement in several attentional domains (e.g., spatial search, object-based attention, sustained attention, selective attention). Notably, vigilance training promoted balanced search efficiency between contra and ispilesional space. While effects on spatial processing faded over the course of follow-up testing (1–2 weeks), benefits in non-spatial domains of attention (e.g., selective attention, vigilance) were longer-lasting. These results suggest that training non-spatial mechanisms of attention may provide beneficial short-term improvements across a number of attentional processing domains while longer-lasting benefits may be specific to the training domain.

Van Vleet, T. DeGutis, J. Robertson, L. (2007). Cognitive rehabilitation of patients with hemispatial neglect: Effects of vigilance training on components of attentional processing [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 7(9):701, 701a, http://journalofvision.org/7/9/701/, doi:10.1167/7.9.701. [CrossRef]
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