June 2007
Volume 7, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2007
A deficit in horizontal interactions causes an imbalance between feedforward and recurrent visual processing, resulting in texture segregation deficits
Author Affiliations
  • Myriam Vandenbroucke
    University of Amsterdam (Department of Psychology), and University Medical Center Utrecht (Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
  • H. Steven Scholte
    University of Amsterdam (Department of Psychology)
  • Herman van Engeland
    University Medical Center Utrecht (Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
  • Chantal Kemner
    University Medical Center Utrecht (Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
  • Victor Lamme
    University of Amsterdam (Department of Psychology)
Journal of Vision June 2007, Vol.7, 906. doi:10.1167/7.9.906
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Myriam Vandenbroucke, H. Steven Scholte, Herman van Engeland, Chantal Kemner, Victor Lamme; A deficit in horizontal interactions causes an imbalance between feedforward and recurrent visual processing, resulting in texture segregation deficits. Journal of Vision 2007;7(9):906. doi: 10.1167/7.9.906.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Although there is considerable evidence for the role of feedforward, horizontal, and recurrent interactions in figure-ground segregation, little is known about how this process would be affected by a selective deficit in one of these interactions. We conjectured that an early deficit in horizontal interactions would disturb the balance between feedforward and recurrent activity. Such an imbalance was expected in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), considering their aberrancies in visual perception. Accordingly, while recording EEG we tested healthy subjects and subjects with ASD on a new texture discrimination task, where surface segregation was varied independently from orientation boundaries. The data confirmed the already established role of recurrent processing in figure-ground segregation, as the feedback related activity decreased with decreasing perceptibility of the surface layout. Second, we found that subjects with ASD had lower performance scores compared to healthy controls on stimuli for which the detection of texture discontinuities was important. However, performance was similar for stimuli in which an extra surface layout was present. The EEG data confirmed this as the ERP associated with the detection of orientation boundaries was absent in the patient group. Interestingly, consecutive feedforward activity to extrastriate cortex was enhanced compared to controls and, finally, feedback activity was normal (although slightly delayed). Apparently, an initial deficit in boundary detection results in a subsequent imbalance between feedforward and recurrent activity. By this imbalance the visual system is able to compensate for deficits in early visual processing, resulting in the proper interpretation of a surface layout.

Vandenbroucke, M. Scholte, H. S. van Engeland, H. Kemner, C. Lamme, V. (2007). A deficit in horizontal interactions causes an imbalance between feedforward and recurrent visual processing, resulting in texture segregation deficits [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 7(9):906, 906a, http://journalofvision.org/7/9/906/, doi:10.1167/7.9.906. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×