December 2007
Volume 7, Issue 15
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2007
Perception, computer graphics, and video games
Author Affiliations
  • Dan Kersten
    University of Minnesota
Journal of Vision December 2007, Vol.7, 39. doi:10.1167/7.15.39
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      Dan Kersten; Perception, computer graphics, and video games. Journal of Vision 2007;7(15):39. doi: 10.1167/7.15.39.

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Abstract
 

Over the past twenty years, computer graphics technology has had a major impact on both empirical and theoretical studies of human vision. On the empirical side, computer graphics has provided unprecedented laboratory control over both the “proximal” and “distal” stimuli. On the theoretical side, computer graphics models of images and objects have stimulated the development of testable theories regarding human ability to extract object information, such as movement, shape or material, from images. Much progress has come through the analysis and resulting ability to synthesize realistic images. But it is widely appreciated that our perceptions are coupled with our decisions and actions. Interactive video games provide new, and relatively unexplored opportunities to study how humans use visual information in realistic tasks where, in addition to manipulating image information, one can control task demands and consequences, such as reward, that influence realistic learning and performance. I will describe some of the history of computer graphics in perception together with recent work using video games.

 
Kersten, D. (2007). Perception, computer graphics, and video games [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 7(15):39, 39a, http://journalofvision.org/7/15/39/, doi:10.1167/7.15.39. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 N00014-05-1-0124, R01 EY015261
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