December 2007
Volume 7, Issue 15
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OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2007
Deficits in speed perception induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation of cortical area V5/MT+
Author Affiliations
  • Declan McKeefry
    Vision Science Research Group, University of Bradford
  • Mark Burton
    Vision Science Research Group, University of Bradford
  • Chara Vakrou
    Vision Science Research Group, University of Bradford
  • Brendan Barrett
    Vision Science Research Group, University of Bradford
  • Anthony Morland
    Dept. Psychology, University of York
Journal of Vision December 2007, Vol.7, 85. doi:10.1167/7.15.85
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      Declan McKeefry, Mark Burton, Chara Vakrou, Brendan Barrett, Anthony Morland; Deficits in speed perception induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation of cortical area V5/MT+. Journal of Vision 2007;7(15):85. doi: 10.1167/7.15.85.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Single-unit neurophysiology in monkeys has highlighted a prominent role for cortical area V5/MT in the analysis of speed of moving objects. We wished to investigate whether human area V5/MT+ plays a similarly important role in speed perception by disrupting its function using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) whilst observers performed speed discrimination behavioural tasks. Area V5/MT and other cortical areas responsive to motion were first localised in 5 subjects using functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI). Using neuronavigation techniques repetitive TMS (rTMS) was then applied unilaterally to these areas whilst observers performed a 2AFC delayed speed discrimination task with stimuli placed in the contra-lateral hemifield. When applied over V1, rTMS had no effect on speed discrimination performance. However, the application of rTMS to area V5/MT+ had two effects: firstly, it elevated speed discrimination thresholds and secondly, it induced a perceived slowing of the test stimulus. When observers performed a spatial frequency discrimination control task the application of rTMS to V5/MT+ did not affect observers? performance. These results indicate that disruption to human V5/MT+ generates selective deficits in the perception of stimulus speed and suggest that this area is likely to play an important role in this aspect of motion perception.

McKeefry, D. Burton, M. Vakrou, C. Barrett, B. Morland, A. (2007). Deficits in speed perception induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation of cortical area V5/MT+ [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 7(15):85, 85a, http://journalofvision.org/7/15/85/, doi:10.1167/7.15.85. [CrossRef]
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