December 2008
Volume 8, Issue 17
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2008
Psychophysical summation of visual motion across eye movements reflects decision processes, not sensory integration
Author Affiliations
  • Adam P. Morris
    School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and, Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA.
  • Charles C. Liu
    School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
  • Simon J. Cropper
    School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
  • Jason D. Forte
    School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
  • Jason B. Mattingley
    Queensland Brain Institute & School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
Journal of Vision December 2008, Vol.8, 70. doi:10.1167/8.17.70
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      Adam P. Morris, Charles C. Liu, Simon J. Cropper, Jason D. Forte, Jason B. Mattingley; Psychophysical summation of visual motion across eye movements reflects decision processes, not sensory integration. Journal of Vision 2008;8(17):70. doi: 10.1167/8.17.70.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Human vision remains perceptually stable despite frequent displacements of the retinal image associated with saccadic eye movements. In the current study, we evaluated recent claims that this visual stability relies on the integration of sensory inputs over time in environmental rather than retinal coordinates. These claims were inspired by a psychophysical phenomenon in which perceptual sensitivity for a motion stimulus presented after a saccade is enhanced when preceded by a priming motion stimulus prior to the saccade at the same spatial position. We characterized the mechanism underlying this psychophysical summation by examining its spatial and directional specificity, as well as its modulation by temporal uncertainty. Summation was similar irrespective of whether the two motion signals occupied the same or different locations in space, and whether they contained the same or opposite directions of motion. Further, the introduction of a tone that announced the onset of motion was sufficient to abolish summation. These data are inconsistent with a sensory-level explanation for psychophysical summation across eye movements and argue against a role for the underlying mechanism in realizing visual stability. Instead, our findings are consistent with a model in which abstracted representations of independent sensory inputs are combined statistically at the level of decision-making.

MelcherD.MorroneM. C. (2003). Spatiotopic temporal integration of visual motion across saccadic eye movements, Nat. Neurosci., 6, 877–881.

Morris, P. Liu, C. Cropper, S. J. Forte, J. D. Mattingley, B. (2008). Psychophysical summation of visual motion across eye movements reflects decision processes, not sensory integration [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(17):70, 70a, http://journalofvision.org/8/17/70/, doi:10.1167/8.17.70. [CrossRef]
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