August 2009
Volume 9, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2009
Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (m-VEPs) in children: similarities and differences between translational and radial motion
Author Affiliations
  • Laura Lefebvre
    Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Canada
  • Gina Muckle
    School of Psychology, Université Laval, Québec, Canada
  • Sandra W. Jacobson
    Department of psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, USA
  • Joseph L. Jacobson
    Department of psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, USA
  • Céline H. Bastien
    School of Psychology, Université Laval, Québec, Canada
  • Dave Saint-Amour
    Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, CanadaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada
Journal of Vision August 2009, Vol.9, 630. doi:10.1167/9.8.630
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      Laura Lefebvre, Gina Muckle, Sandra W. Jacobson, Joseph L. Jacobson, Céline H. Bastien, Dave Saint-Amour; Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (m-VEPs) in children: similarities and differences between translational and radial motion. Journal of Vision 2009;9(8):630. doi: 10.1167/9.8.630.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 

Although translational motion (t-motion) is often used in motion-onset VEP studies, other types of motion such as radial motion (r-motion) have been shown to be efficient stimuli as well. However, the motion-onset VEPs are not well known in children. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare VEP responses to t-motion and r-motion in a large homogenous paediatric sample.

 

Motion-onset VEPs have been tested in a cohort of Inuit children (mean = 11,3 ±1 year) using left-right t-motion (n=125) and contraction-expansion radial motion (n=98). For both types of stimuli, motion-onset was evoked by an initial stationary period of 1120 ms follow by an abrupt and rapid motion (duration: 160 ms; velocity: 6,5 deg/s; contrast: 10%). Motion direction was unpredictable. Brain responses were recorded from 32 scalp electrodes according to the 10–20 system.

 

The amplitude of the P1 and the N2 components to r-motion were significantly stronger compare to t-motion. In both cases, the topographic mapping of the electrical activity shows a lateralized right hemisphere distribution over the occipito-temporal region, which was more important for r-motion. No significant difference was found for latency.

 

This study shows in school-age children that VEP responses evoked by r-motion are clearly more robust than those evoked by t-motion. This finding is consistent with previous reports in adults. Because r-motion is associated with a better signal and minimize ocular artefacts, this type of stimulus might therefore be more appropriate for paediatric motion-onset VEP assessment.

 
Lefebvre, L. Muckle, G. Jacobson, S. W. Jacobson, J. L. Bastien, C. H. Saint-Amour, D. (2009). Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (m-VEPs) in children: similarities and differences between translational and radial motion [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 9(8):630, 630a, http://journalofvision.org/9/8/630/, doi:10.1167/9.8.630. [CrossRef]
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