August 2009
Volume 9, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2009
Eye, head, and hand coordination in 16-to 36-Month-Old infants
Author Affiliations
  • Thomas Baker
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, and School of Optometry, Indiana University
  • Chen Yu
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University
  • Rowan Candy
    School of Optometry, Indiana University
  • Linda Smith
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University
  • Seehyun Kim
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University
Journal of Vision August 2009, Vol.9, 835. doi:10.1167/9.8.835
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Thomas Baker, Chen Yu, Rowan Candy, Linda Smith, Seehyun Kim; Eye, head, and hand coordination in 16-to 36-Month-Old infants. Journal of Vision 2009;9(8):835. doi: 10.1167/9.8.835.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Infants and young children learn by viewing and interacting with their world (Gibson, 1969). While previous developmental studies have used a camera to document toddlers' everyday activities from a third-person perspective, we have recently developed a new technique that allows us to collect multiple streams of data simultaneously to gain insight into the first-person perspective of a young toddler. We collected eye movements using a Tobii X120 eye tracker, head and hand movements using 6D position sensors and the first person perspective of the visual field using a mini-camera attached to the head of the toddler. The toddlers viewed balls on rods emerging from a puppet show theater to a point where they could look, touch and interact with them.

The data indicate that 59% of the time the head, hands and eyes were stationary, as compared with less than 1% of the time when all three were moving. Furthermore, eyes were moving less than 1% of the time while hands and head were still. The data provide fine-grained dynamic information about the first-person perspective of young toddlers, and provide new insights about the the multimodal organization of attention, perception and action as toddlers interact with their caregivers and the world around them.

Baker, T. Yu, C. Candy, R. Smith, L. Kim, S. (2009). Eye, head, and hand coordination in 16-to 36-Month-Old infants [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 9(8):835, 835a, http://journalofvision.org/9/8/835/, doi:10.1167/9.8.835. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×