August 2009
Volume 9, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2009
Playing action video games leads to better perceptual templates
Author Affiliations
  • Renjie Li
    Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Center for Visual Sciences, U. of Rochester
  • Vikranth R. Bejjanki
    Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Center for Visual Sciences, U. of Rochester
  • Zhonglin Lu
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California
  • Alexandre Pouget
    Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Center for Visual Sciences, U. of Rochester
  • Daphne Bavelier
    Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Center for Visual Sciences, U. of Rochester
Journal of Vision August 2009, Vol.9, 860. doi:10.1167/9.8.860
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Renjie Li, Vikranth R. Bejjanki, Zhonglin Lu, Alexandre Pouget, Daphne Bavelier; Playing action video games leads to better perceptual templates. Journal of Vision 2009;9(8):860. doi: 10.1167/9.8.860.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Action video game playing substantially improves visual performance; however, the source of this improvement remains unclear. Here we use the equivalent external noise technique to characterize the mechanism(s) by which action video games may facilitate performance (Lu & Dosher, 1998).

In a first study, Action Video Game Players (VGPs) and Non-Action Video Game Players (NVGPs) performed a foveal orientation identification task at different external noise levels. Threshold versus external noise contrast (TvC) functions were measured at two performance criterion levels. VGPs showed lower thresholds than NVGPs with a marked difference at high noise levels. Fitting the data with the Perceptual Template Model indicated that two independent factors contribute to the superior performance of VGPs: an 11% additive noise reduction and a 25% external noise exclusion.

The causal effect of action video game playing was confirmed in a 50 hour training study, whereby NVGPs were randomly divided into an experimental group that played action video games and a control group that played control games. TvC functions were measured before and after training. The same change as in VGPs was observed in action game trainees, whereas no change in external noise reduction was observed in the control group. This work establishes that playing action video games leads to robust external noise exclusion, consistent with the use of better matched perceptual templates.

To confirm that action video game playing leads to the development of better templates for the task at hand, we also used a probabilistic neural model of orientation selectivity. We found that changes in TvC curves induced by action video game playing can be captured by changing one parameter - the strength of the feedforward connections in the model. Together, this work demonstrates that action video game playing improves performance by allowing gamers to develop better task-relevant templates than non gamers.

Li, R. Bejjanki, V. R. Lu, Z. Pouget, A. Bavelier, D. (2009). Playing action video games leads to better perceptual templates [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 9(8):860, 860a, http://journalofvision.org/9/8/860/, doi:10.1167/9.8.860. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×