August 2009
Volume 9, Issue 8
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2009
Why features defined purely by color need not be represented at early stages of visual analysis
Author Affiliations
  • Maria Michela Del Viva
    Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, and Visual Science Laboratories, Institute for Mind and Biology, University of Chicago
  • Giovanni Punzi
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pisa
  • Steven Shevell
    Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, and Visual Science Laboratories, Institute for Mind and Biology, University of Chicago
Journal of Vision August 2009, Vol.9, 913. doi:10.1167/9.8.913
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Maria Michela Del Viva, Giovanni Punzi, Steven Shevell; Why features defined purely by color need not be represented at early stages of visual analysis. Journal of Vision 2009;9(8):913. doi: 10.1167/9.8.913.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The visual system summarizes complex scenes to extract meaningful features (Barlow, 1959; Marr 1976) by using image primitives (edges, bars), encoded physiologically by specific configuration of receptive fields (Hubel & Wiesel, 1962). We recently proposed a pattern-filtering approach, based on the principle of most efficient information coding under real-world physical limitations (Punzi & Del Viva VSS-2006), that is a good predictor of an early stage of visual analysis. The model, when applied to black and white images, predicts from very general principles the structure of visual filters that closely resemble well-known receptive fields, and identifies salient features, such as edges and lines. A comparison with the performance of human observers showed that human sensitivity closely follows the model predictions (Del Viva & Punzi VSS-2006). Here, the same approach is applied to a set of colored natural images, in order to consider the role of color in the initial stages of image processing and edge detection. Again, the model identifies salient features in these more complex and realistic images, using both color and luminance information. The model predicts, however, that color information is used in a very different way from luminance information. The results show that equiluminant patterns are far from being efficient coders of information: they are either too common (uniform colored regions) or too rare and therefore are discarded by our approach. These results thus provide a theoretical explanation from first-principles for the presence of cells, in primary visual areas, that do not discriminate between chromatic or achromatic spatial patterns (see for example Johnson et al., 2001).

Del Viva, M. M. Punzi, G. Shevell, S. (2009). Why features defined purely by color need not be represented at early stages of visual analysis [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 9(8):913, 913a, http://journalofvision.org/9/8/913/, doi:10.1167/9.8.913. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 Supported by NIH grant EY-04802.
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×