December 2009
Volume 9, Issue 14
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2009
In vivo imaging the photoreceptors in the chicken eye with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope
Author Affiliations
  • Yuhua Zhang
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Jun Xu
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Mariana Garcia
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Austin Roorda
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Christine Wildsoet
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
Journal of Vision December 2009, Vol.9, 79. doi:10.1167/9.14.79
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      Yuhua Zhang, Jun Xu, Mariana Garcia, Austin Roorda, Christine Wildsoet; In vivo imaging the photoreceptors in the chicken eye with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Journal of Vision 2009;9(14):79. doi: 10.1167/9.14.79.

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Abstract

The chicken is the most commonly used animal model for the study of refractive error development and myopia. In vivo imaging the photoreceptors in this model may provide new insight into the effect of myopic eye growth on cone photoreceptor distribution. To achieve this goal, we developed a chicken retina-imaging module on an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO), originally designed for imaging the human eye. The unit included a confocal scanning laser imaging system, a low coherence light source, and a MEMS deformable mirror-based adaptive optics (AO) system. We modified the scanning optics to accommodate the smaller pupil size of the chicken, and made a platform with multiple degrees of freedom for positioning the chicken and appropriately aligning the chicken eye for sequential scanning across a selected retinal location. With AO compensation for the ocular aberration of the chicken eye, their cone photoreceptors were clearly visible. After in vivo imaging, the retinas from the same animals were whole-mounted, photoreceptors uppermost, and their mosaic photographed with a Zeiss deconvolution microscope, and cones counted to obtain comparative cone density data. As cone density maps can be constructed from in vivo images, the AOSLO is an effective tool for the longitudinal study of refractive error-induced changes in cone density.

Zhang, Y. Xu, J. Garcia, M. Roorda, A. Wildsoet, C. (2009). In vivo imaging the photoreceptors in the chicken eye with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 9(14):79, 79a, http://journalofvision.org/9/14/79/, doi:10.1167/9.14.79. [CrossRef]
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