May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Prestidigitation: Easier to fool the eye than the hand
Author Affiliations
  • Jennifer Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Michael Levine
    Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • J. Jason McAnany
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 1051. doi:10.1167/8.6.1051
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jennifer Anderson, Michael Levine, J. Jason McAnany; Prestidigitation: Easier to fool the eye than the hand. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):1051. doi: 10.1167/8.6.1051.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Processing in the dorsal and ventral visual pathways has been studied in brain-damaged subjects. We sought to understand processing in these visual pathways in the normal human brain. To do this, we asked subjects to respond in two different ways to the same visual stimuli. A target that emerged from the top or the bottom of the display traversed a field of leftward or rightward moving distracters, which induced an illusory deflection of the target (the Duncker illusion). In the hand-eye condition, the display was arranged such that the subject's hand was on the same virtual plane as the target and distracters. The subject's goal was to “stab” the target with a stylus before it reached a horizontal bar spanning the center of the display; we believe the dorsal pathway mediates such hand-eye coordination. In the cognitive condition, the subject saw the same display and decided where the target would have intercepted the central bar. The subject indicated a choice on a virtual keypad that appeared after the display concluded; we believe the ventral pathway mediates such cognitive tasks. We found the effect of illusory motion in the cognitive condition but not in the hand-eye condition. In the cognitive condition, when the distracters were moving leftwards the subject reported the target to be headed to the right of the actual location, and vice versa. In the hand-eye condition, the motion of the distracters did not affect the subject's response. These results suggest a way to examine the two visual pathways separately in the normal human brain. By manipulating properties of the stimuli and distracters we are learning more about normal visual processing.

Anderson, J. Levine, M. McAnany, J. J. (2008). Prestidigitation: Easier to fool the eye than the hand [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):1051, 1051a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/1051/, doi:10.1167/8.6.1051. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×