May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Stimulus coding rules for perceptual learning
Author Affiliations
  • Cong Yu
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University
  • Jun-Yun Zhang
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University
  • Shu-Guang Kuai
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University
  • Lu-Qi Xiao
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University
  • Stanley Klein
    School of Optometry and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, UC Berkeley
  • Dennis Levi
    School of Optometry and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, UC Berkeley
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 1136. doi:10.1167/8.6.1136
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      Cong Yu, Jun-Yun Zhang, Shu-Guang Kuai, Lu-Qi Xiao, Stanley Klein, Dennis Levi; Stimulus coding rules for perceptual learning. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):1136. doi: 10.1167/8.6.1136.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Background: We reported previously (Kuai et al., NN2005) that perceptual learning of contrast and motion direction discrimination occurs when multi-stimuli are presented in a fixed sequence (temporal patterning), but not randomly (roving), which points to the need for proper stimulus coding for multi-stimulus learning to occur. In this study we examined the stimulus coding rules for perceptual learning with multi-stimuli. Methods: Subjects practice contrast discrimination of Gabors at multiple reference contrasts and orientation discrimination of illusory lines at multiple reference orientations in various roving and temporal pattering conditions. Results: 1) Stimulus rhythm, especially temporally evenly spaced, is necessary for temporal patterning to take effect during practice. 2) Both the encoding phase, and the slow consolidation phases as least 4 hours after each practice session, of perceptual learning are subject to roving disruption; 3) However, after completion of temporal patterned learning, performance is undisrupted by extended roving training, and instead learning is transferable to the roving condition; 4) Roving is ineffective if each stimulus is presented in a block of five or more consecutive trials; 5) Roving is also ineffective if each stimulus has a distinct identity, either due to large inter-stimulus difference, or inherited identity (i.e., cardinal/oblique orientations), or assigned identity through pre-trial letter cueing. Conclusions: Our results sketched some basic rules for stimulus encoding, consolidation, and retrieval for multi-stimulus perceptual learning. These rules may be needed because the brain needs to “tag” each stimulus, in order to switch attention to the appropriate perceptual template. Stimulus temporal patterning assists in tagging stimuli and switching attention through its rhythmic stimulus sequence. However, once the identities are learned, stimulus information can be efficiently retrieved to guide visual discrimination regardless of the stimulus temporal context.

Yu, C. Zhang, J.-Y. Kuai, S.-G. Xiao, L.-Q. Klein, S. Levi, D. (2008). Stimulus coding rules for perceptual learning [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):1136, 1136a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/1136/, doi:10.1167/8.6.1136. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 NSFC 30725018, NEI RO1-04776, NEI RO1-01728.
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