May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Position independence in object recognition
Author Affiliations
  • Dwight Kravitz
    Unit on Learning and Plasticity, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institutes of Mental Health
  • Latrice Vinson
    Unit on Learning and Plasticity, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institutes of Mental Health
  • Chris Baker
    Unit on Learning and Plasticity, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institutes of Mental Health
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 518. doi:10.1167/8.6.518
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Dwight Kravitz, Latrice Vinson, Chris Baker; Position independence in object recognition. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):518. doi: 10.1167/8.6.518.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Although object recognition is often assumed to be position invariant or independent,the human behavioral evidence is ambiguous, with studies reporting evidence both for and against position independence. Moreover, many of these studies also suffer from potential attentional and semantic confounds. Critically, two key predictions derived from the properties of the ventral visual pathway have not been explicitly tested. First, there has been no reported test of the relative transfer between and within hemifields, despite the clear expectation from both single cell and human physiology that between hemifield translations should engage different pools of neurons and hence evidence less transfer. Second, there has been no explicit test of translations between the periphery and fovea, despite their known differences in the neural representation. Here we utilized masked subliminal priming to test the limits of position invariance in purely visual object recognition. In an object decision task, participants were asked to indicate whether a briefly presented (66ms) and masked stimulus was a whole or scrambled line drawing of an object, which could be either familiar or novel. The amount of priming observed during a later (128–256 trials) presentation of the same object served as the measure of transfer. In a series of experiments we show that 1) between hemifield translations evidence less priming than within hemifield translations, 2) priming decreased with increasing numbers of intervening stimuli, and 3) there was an asymmetry in priming between the fovea and periphery even when acuity was controlled for. These results provide evidence for only limited position invariance in object recognition.

Kravitz, D. Vinson, L. Baker, C. (2008). Position independence in object recognition [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):518, 518a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/518/, doi:10.1167/8.6.518. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×