May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Distinct neural signatures of motion-induced blindness in human visual cortex
Author Affiliations
  • Tobias Donner
    Department of Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University
  • Dov Sagi
    Department of Neurobiology, Brain Research, The Weizmann Institute of Science
  • Yoram Bonneh
    Department of Neurobiology, Brain Research, The Weizmann Institute of Science
  • David Heeger
    Department of Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 538. doi:10.1167/8.6.538
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Tobias Donner, Dov Sagi, Yoram Bonneh, David Heeger; Distinct neural signatures of motion-induced blindness in human visual cortex. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):538. doi: 10.1167/8.6.538.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Motion induced blindness (MIB) is a visual phenomenon in which a salient static target spontaneously fluctuates in and out of visual awareness when surrounded by a moving pattern. We characterized the modulation of neural activity in multiple human visual areas correlated with perceptual re-organization during MIB. Observers reported the subjective disappearance and re-appearance of a high-contrast target contour surrounded by a moving random dot pattern (the mask) while neural activity was measured with fMRI. We identified the sub-regions of each visual area in each observer that corresponded to the target and the mask. For each of these sub-regions, average fMRI response time courses were estimated during the disappearance and re-appearance of the target. Responses in target-specific sub-regions of V1 through V4 decreased with target disappearance and increased with re-appearance. These responses were particularly strong in V4 and were followed by a delayed global modulation expressed throughout V1-V4. Mask-specific sub-regions in dorsal stream areas MT and the posterior intraparietal sulcus (IPS) exhibited the opposite pattern of modulation; responses increased with target disappearance and decreased with target re-appearance. The responses time courses in the mask-specific sub-regions of MT and IPS were anti-correlated with the response time courses in the target-specific sub-regions of V2, V3, and V4. Our results demonstrate that the spontaneous perceptual re-organization during MIB has multiple distinct neural signatures in human visual cortex. The responses of the target sub-regions of early ventral stream areas specifically reflect observers' fluctuating awareness of the target.

Donner, T. Sagi, D. Bonneh, Y. Heeger, D. (2008). Distinct neural signatures of motion-induced blindness in human visual cortex [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):538, 538a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/538/, doi:10.1167/8.6.538. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 Supported by grants from the Leopoldina National Academy of Science (BMBF-LPD 9901/8-136, T.D.) and the NIH (R01-EY16752, D.H.).
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×