May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Imaging prior information in the visual system
Author Affiliations
  • Scott Gorlin
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA
  • Jitendra Sharma
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, and Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, MIT, Cambridge, MA
  • Hiroki Sugihara
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, and Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, MIT, Cambridge, MA
  • Mriganka Sur
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, and Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, MIT, Cambridge, MA
  • Pawan Sinha
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 86. doi:10.1167/8.6.86
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      Scott Gorlin, Jitendra Sharma, Hiroki Sugihara, Mriganka Sur, Pawan Sinha; Imaging prior information in the visual system. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):86. doi: 10.1167/8.6.86.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Prior information and experience with visual stimuli enhance our ability to recognize images, but where and how does this facilitation occur in the brain? Using stimuli which temporally evolve out of noise and then degrade again, we show that recognition of degraded stimuli persists past the level of noise required for initial recognition, a phenomenon known as hysteresis. Furthermore, using machine learning algorithms, we can quantify the amount of information a given brain region or neuron contains about the stimulus as the subject learns the coherent image. Here we show how distinct brain regions from prefrontal cortex to V1 contain more information about degraded stimuli with prior knowledge, and that local information in the brain persists in line with behavioral hysteresis. Interestingly, behavioral and neural hysteresis depends critically on the complexity of the stimuli, so that prior information seems to be encoded over complex, real-world features, but not simple stimuli such as oriented gratings.

Gorlin, S. Sharma, J. Sugihara, H. Sur, M. Sinha, P. (2008). Imaging prior information in the visual system [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):86, 86a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/86/, doi:10.1167/8.6.86. [CrossRef]
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