May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Adaptation of saccadic eye movements: behavioural evidence for different mechanisms controlling saccade amplitude lengthening and shortening
Author Affiliations
  • Muriel Panouillères
    Espace et Action, U864 Inserm - University Lyon 1, Lyon (France)
  • Julien Cotti
    Mouvement et Perception, UMR 6152, CNRS - Université de la Méditerranée, Marseilles (France)
  • Alain Guillaume
    Mouvement et Perception, UMR 6152, CNRS - Université de la Méditerranée, Marseilles (France)
  • Christian Urquizar
    Espace et Action, U864 Inserm - University Lyon 1, Lyon (France)
  • Roméo Salemme
    Espace et Action, U864 Inserm - University Lyon 1, Lyon (France)
  • Douglas P. Munoz
    Centre for Neuroscience Studies, University Queen's, Kingston (Canada)
  • Denis Pélisson
    Espace et Action, U864 Inserm - University Lyon 1, Lyon (France)
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 920. doi:10.1167/8.6.920
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Muriel Panouillères, Julien Cotti, Alain Guillaume, Christian Urquizar, Roméo Salemme, Douglas P. Munoz, Denis Pélisson; Adaptation of saccadic eye movements: behavioural evidence for different mechanisms controlling saccade amplitude lengthening and shortening. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):920. doi: 10.1167/8.6.920.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Ocular saccades are fast and accurate movements of both eyes. Saccade accuracy can be maintained throughout life by adaptation mechanisms despite physiological or pathological alterations of the sensorimotor system. This study was aimed at testing whether these saccadic adaptation mechanisms involve changes in the sensory and/or motor stages of sensorimotor transformation. We used the double-step target paradigm to adapt reactive saccades directed to the right. Leftward (backward condition) and rightward (forward condition) intrasaccadic target steps were used to, respectively, decrease and increase saccade amplitude in different subjects groups. In each condition, we measured the effects of these adaptive changes of pro-saccades amplitude on anti-saccades (saccades directed to the opposite direction of a target). In the backward condition, all 8 tested subjects showed a statistically significant decrease of the amplitude of their rightward pro-saccades (−17.3 ± 1.9% on average). A group analysis showed a significant transfer of adaptation to rightward (“motor”) anti-saccades (average gain change = −18.4±2.8%), but not to leftward (“sensory”) anti-saccades (+3.6±4.8%). In the forward condition, only 8 of the 12 tested subjects showed a significant adaptive increase of the amplitude of their rightward pro-saccades (+11.5±2.1% on average). Moreover, the group analysis performed in these 8 adapted subjects did not reveal any transfer of adaptation to “motor” and “sensory” anti-saccades (+4.7±4% and +2.3±4.8%). Control experiments achieved in two further groups of 15 and 10 subjects rejected the contribution of unspecific factors (e.g. fatigue …) in this pattern of results, and duplicated these results for the other direction (leftward) of trained saccades. These findings suggest that, whereas the level of involvement of forward adaptation cannot be resolved, the mechanisms involved in the backward adaptation of reactive saccades 1) take place at a motor level, and 2) clearly differ from those involved in the forward adaptation.

Panouillères, M. Cotti, J. Guillaume, A. Urquizar, C. Salemme, R. Munoz, D. P. Pèlisson, D. (2008). Adaptation of saccadic eye movements: behavioural evidence for different mechanisms controlling saccade amplitude lengthening and shortening [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):920, 920a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/920/, doi:10.1167/8.6.920. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 This work was supported by ANR grant to DP.
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×