May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Adaptation of saccadic eye movements: neurological evidence for different mechanisms controlling the amplitude of reactive and voluntary saccades
Author Affiliations
  • Denis Pélisson
    Espace et Action U864, Inserm and Lyon1 University, Lyon (France)
  • Muriel Panouilléres
    Espace et Action U864, Inserm and Lyon1 University, Lyon (France)
  • Nadia Alahyane
    Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen's University, Kingston (Canada)
  • Christian Urquizar
    Espace et Action U864, Inserm and Lyon1 University, Lyon (France)
  • Roméo Salemme
    Espace et Action U864, Inserm and Lyon1 University, Lyon (France)
  • Caroline Tilikete
    Espace et Action U864, Inserm and Lyon1 University, Lyon (France)
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 921. doi:10.1167/8.6.921
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      Denis Pélisson, Muriel Panouilléres, Nadia Alahyane, Christian Urquizar, Roméo Salemme, Caroline Tilikete; Adaptation of saccadic eye movements: neurological evidence for different mechanisms controlling the amplitude of reactive and voluntary saccades. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):921. doi: 10.1167/8.6.921.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

How the central nervous system generates accurate motor behaviour across the life span is a fundamental issue in Neuroscience. Sensory-motor adaptation processes play a central role, and yet their underlying neural substrates and task-specificity bases are still poorly understood. We addressed these issues here by studying adaptation of saccadic eye movements, a well-established model of sensorimotor plasticity. The cerebellum plays a major role in saccadic adaptation but it has not yet been investigated whether this role can account for the known specificity of adaptation to the saccade type (e.g. reactive versus voluntary). In this study, we used the double-step target paradigm to measure the adaptive abilities in 9 neurological patients at a chronic stage after a stroke affecting different cerebellar and/or pre-cerebellar areas. Each patient was tested during two separate sessions, for reactive saccades (RS) triggered by the sudden appearance of a visual target, and scanning voluntary saccades (VS) performed when exploring a more complex scene. The results revealed that 6 out of 9 patients showed a deficit in saccadic adaptation: 2 patients for RS, 3 for VS and one patient for both RS and VS. Thus, a dissociation of adaptive abilities between reactive and voluntary saccades was seen in 5 subjects, suggesting the involvement of separate cerebellar modules for the two saccade types. The deficit mostly concerned ipsilesional saccades rather than controlesional saccades. These findings extend for the first time the demonstrated role of the cerebellum in RS adaptation to adaptation of VS and hence suggest a cerebellar involvement in task-switching processes for oculomotor plasticity. They are consistent with our recent proposal that the adaptive update of saccadic commands involves both a brainstem site common for RS and VS and partially separated areas in the cerebellum specific to the reactive or voluntary task (Alahyane et al., Brain Res., 2007).

Pélisson, D. Panouilléres, M. Alahyane, N. Urquizar, C. Salemme, R. Tilikete, C. (2008). Adaptation of saccadic eye movements: neurological evidence for different mechanisms controlling the amplitude of reactive and voluntary saccades [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):921, 921a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/921/, doi:10.1167/8.6.921. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 This work was supported by ANR grant to DP, a FRM fellowship to NA, and was promoted by the Hospices Civils de Lyon, project n° 2002.303.
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