May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Individual differences in depth perception: are biases correlated with eye position?
Author Affiliations
  • Julie Harris
    School of Psychology, University of St. Andrews, Scotland, UK
  • Adrien Chopin
    CNRS and Universite Paris Descartes, France
  • Katherina Zeiner
    School of Psychology, University of St. Andrews, Scotland, UK
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 93. doi:10.1167/8.6.93
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Julie Harris, Adrien Chopin, Katherina Zeiner; Individual differences in depth perception: are biases correlated with eye position?. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):93. doi: 10.1167/8.6.93.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

We have previously shown that scene configuration can result in biases in relative depth perception. If a pair of points is separated both vertically, and by a depth difference some observers perceive greater depth between the points if the top is the farthest point, or vice-versa (Harris et al, VSS 2007). Here we explored whether individual differences in eye position, specifically in cyclovergence, could account for these biases.

In a single experiment, observers performed both a relative depth judgement and a psychophysical cyclovergence task. For the relative depth judgement, observers viewed two intervals. In each they saw a pair of dots, one above the other, with a depth separation between them. The task was to decide in which interval the depth separation was larger, or smaller. The dot pair could appear in two configurations: in one the upper dot was presented behind the screen plane, the lower dot presented in front (and vice-versa for the other). We compared conditions in which a test stimulus was presented in the same configuration as the fixed standard stimulus (e.g. test and standard: upper far, lower near), with conditions in which the configurations were opposite (e.g. test: upper far, lower near; standard: upper near, lower far). Immediately after each depth trial, cyclovergence was measured using a horizontal nonius line technique.

If an observer exhibited cyclovergence, one would expect a consistent bias to see one of the configurations as containing more depth than the other. Across a number of observers, we found only a very weak correlation between depth bias and cyclovergence. Further, the amount of cyclovergence measured was considerably smaller than that required to account for the biases. Our results therefore suggest that eye position differences due to cyclovergence cannot account for the large idiosyncratic biases found across observers.

Harris, J. Chopin, A. Zeiner, K. (2008). Individual differences in depth perception: are biases correlated with eye position? [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):93, 93a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/93/, doi:10.1167/8.6.93. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×