May 2008
Volume 8, Issue 6
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Visual performance and glare: Spatial properties of visual obscuration
Author Affiliations
  • James Stringham
    Northrop Grumman Corporation, Air Force Research Labroratory, Brooks City-Base, TX
  • Peter Smith
    Northrop Grumman Corporation, Air Force Research Labroratory, Brooks City-Base, TX
  • Leon McLin
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks City-Base, TX
Journal of Vision May 2008, Vol.8, 949. doi:10.1167/8.6.949
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      James Stringham, Peter Smith, Leon McLin; Visual performance and glare: Spatial properties of visual obscuration. Journal of Vision 2008;8(6):949. doi: 10.1167/8.6.949.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the size of a glare image on the retina and the ability to detect a visual stimulus in and around the glare field. For this, we measured the ability to detect a Gabor patch stimulus through glare from 532 nm laser illumination. Methods: A three-channel standard Maxwellian-view optical system was employed. One channel projected the extended-source laser images; a second channel projected the standard laser image; and the third channel projected the background and Gabor patch, which were presented on a LCD monitor. The laser glare stimulus size ranged from a standard point source to an 8° extended-source field, and the angle between the laser glare and Gabor patch stimuli was from central, or 0° aspect, to 5° off-aspect angle. The mean luminance of the monitor was 100 cd·m−2, and the contrast of the Gabor patch stimuli was 60%. Results: The extended-source images proved to be much more effective at obscuring the Gabor targets than the standard, point-source laser. In cases where the extended-source laser covered the Gabor patch, at least 1.5 log units less retinal irradiance was necessary to obscure the target, compared to the point-source laser. Additionally, as the extended-source laser stimulus size increased, progressively less retinal irradiance was needed to obscure targets “under” the laser. This suggests a spatial summation effect for obscuration by glare.

Conclusions: Glare effectiveness increases with the size of the glare image, and, for large sources, spatial summation effects contribute to this increased effectiveness.

Stringham, J. Smith, P. McLin, L. (2008). Visual performance and glare: Spatial properties of visual obscuration [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6):949, 949a, http://journalofvision.org/8/6/949/, doi:10.1167/8.6.949. [CrossRef]
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