August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Lateral Occipital cortex responsive to correlation structure of natural images
Author Affiliations
  • H.Steven Scholte
    Department of psychology, University of Amsterdam
  • Sennay Ghebreab
    Informatics Institute, University of Amsterdam
  • Arnold Smeulders
    Informatics Institute, University of Amsterdam
  • Victor Lamme
    Department of psychology, University of Amsterdam
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 1363. doi:10.1167/10.7.1363
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      H.Steven Scholte, Sennay Ghebreab, Arnold Smeulders, Victor Lamme; Lateral Occipital cortex responsive to correlation structure of natural images. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):1363. doi: 10.1167/10.7.1363.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The distribution of features around any location in natural images adheres to the Weibull distribution (Geusebroek & Smeulders, 2005), which is a family of distribution deforming from normal to a power-law distribution with 2 free parameters, beta and gamma. The gamma parameter from the Weibull distribution indicates whether the data has a more power-low or more normal distribution. We recently showed that the brain is capable of estimating the beta and gamma value of a scene by summarizing the X and Y cell populations of the LGN (Scholte et al., 2009) and that this explains 85% of the variance in the early ERP. Here we investigate to what degree the brain is sensitive to differences in the global correlation (gamma) of a scene by presenting subjects with a wide range of natural images while measuring BOLD-MRI. Covariance analysis of the single-trial BOLD-MRI data with the gamma parameter showed that only the lateral occipital cortex (LO), and no other areas, responds stronger to low gamma values (corresponding to images with a power-law distribution) than high gamma values (corresponding to images with a normal distribution). The analysis of the covariance matrix of the voxel-pattern cross-correlated single-trial data further revealed that responses to images containing clear objects are more similar in their spatial structure than images that do not contain objects. This data is consisted with a wide range of literature over object perception and area LO (Grill-Spector et al., 2001) and extend our understanding of object recognition by showing that the global correlation structure of a scene is (part of) the diagnostics that are used by the brain to detect objects.

Scholte, H. Ghebreab, S. Smeulders, A. Lamme, V. (2010). Lateral Occipital cortex responsive to correlation structure of natural images [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):1363, 1363a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/1363, doi:10.1363/10.7.1363. [CrossRef]
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