August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Gaze Patterns and Visual Salience in Change Detection of Natural Scenes
Author Affiliations
  • Ty W. Boyer
    Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Indiana University
  • Chen Yu
    Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Indiana University
  • Thomas Smith
    Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Indiana University
  • Bennett I. Bertenthal
    Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Indiana University
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 169. doi:10.1167/10.7.169
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      Ty W. Boyer, Chen Yu, Thomas Smith, Bennett I. Bertenthal; Gaze Patterns and Visual Salience in Change Detection of Natural Scenes. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):169. doi: 10.1167/10.7.169.

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Abstract

Most change blindness studies suggest that attention is necessary to detect a change in a scene. Recent research also suggests that visual attention is guided in part by bottom-up visual salience of the regions in a scene. In this study, we used an image processing algorithm for measuring the visual salience of different regions in a visual scene, and measured participants' ability to detect changes in high and low salience regions of the scenes with a flicker paradigm. The stimuli were 28 digital photographs of natural outdoor scenes. Itti's saliency map algorithm was used to select one high saliency and one low saliency region in each image; color or presence/absence changes were applied to both regions. Participants completed 56 trials; one low and one high salience trial with each image. We also used a Tobii 2150 eye tracking system for measuring eye movement. Preliminary results indicate: 1) Participants detected changes made to high salience regions (M = 6,855 ms) faster than those made to low salience regions (M = 10,397 ms); 2) Participants fixated high visual salience changed regions (first fixation onset M = 2,812 ms) sooner than low visual salience changed regions (M = 4,339 ms); 3) The total time fixating changed regions was similar in the two conditions (Mhigh = 915 ms and Mlow = 1073 ms); and 4) Participants were more likely to require more than one fixation within the region of change to detect the change in the low saliency condition. An analysis of the eye movement data will allow us to further investigate individual differences in scene perception and change detection.

Boyer, T. W. Yu, C. Smith, T. Bertenthal, B. I. (2010). Gaze Patterns and Visual Salience in Change Detection of Natural Scenes [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):169, 169a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/169, doi:10.1167/10.7.169. [CrossRef]
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