August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Perception of simultaneity is impaired in correspondence to the amount of allocated attention: Evidence from a visual prior entry study
Author Affiliations
  • Katharina Weiß
    University of Paderborn, Department of Cultural Sciences
  • Ingrid Scharlau
    University of Paderborn, Department of Cultural Sciences
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 223. doi:10.1167/10.7.223
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Katharina Weiß, Ingrid Scharlau; Perception of simultaneity is impaired in correspondence to the amount of allocated attention: Evidence from a visual prior entry study. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):223. doi: 10.1167/10.7.223.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Studies on visual prior entry show that two stimuli presented simultaneously, or with short temporal delay, are only rarely perceived as simultaneous if one of these stimuli is attended to. If the same two stimuli are equally unattended, simultaneity is frequently perceived. The temporal profile model (Stelmach & Herdman, 1991, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol. 17(2), pp. 539-550) predicts such an impairment of simultaneity perception by attention and allows to quantify this impairment. The higher the amount of attention selectively allocated towards one of two stimuli, the less often these stimuli should be perceived as simultaneous. We tested this hypothesis in a visual prior-entry paradigm, using masked and non-masked peripheral cues for orienting attention. The amount of attentional allocation was manipulated by varying the temporal delay between cue and cued target (34 ms, 68 ms and 102 ms). Since in larger cue-target delays the cue has more time to shift attention towards its location, a higher amount of attention should be allocated towards the respective cued target. Observers judged simultaneity of two visual stimuli presented with varying temporal delays either with a temporal-order or a simultaneity-judgment task. Results supported the hypothesis that perception of simultaneity depends on the amount of attentional allocation: The larger the cue-target delay, the less frequent were the simultaneous judgments. Visibility of the cue and the judgment task had no influence on this effect. These results provide a challenge for theories on temporal (order) perception because they contradict an (implicit) assumption of most models, viz. that simultaneity should be perceived if temporal order cannot be detected and vice versa.

Weiß, K. Scharlau, I. (2010). Perception of simultaneity is impaired in correspondence to the amount of allocated attention: Evidence from a visual prior entry study [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):223, 223a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/223, doi:10.1167/10.7.223. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×