August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Race-specific norms for coding face identity and a functional role for norms
Author Affiliations
  • Regine Armann
    Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tuebingen, Germany
  • Linda Jeffery
    School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Australia
  • Andrew J. Calder
    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK
  • Isabelle Bülthoff
    Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tuebingen, Germany
  • Gillian Rhodes
    School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Australia
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 706. doi:10.1167/10.7.706
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      Regine Armann, Linda Jeffery, Andrew J. Calder, Isabelle Bülthoff, Gillian Rhodes; Race-specific norms for coding face identity and a functional role for norms. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):706. doi: 10.1167/10.7.706.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

High-level perceptual aftereffects have revealed that faces are coded relative to norms that are dynamically updated by experience. The nature of these norms and the advantage of such a norm-based representation, however, are not yet fully understood. Here, we used adaptation techniques to get insight into the perception of faces of different race categories. We measured identity aftereffects for adapt-test pairs that were opposite a race-specific average and pairs that were opposite a ‘generic’ average, made by morphing together Asian and Caucasian faces. Aftereffects were larger following exposure to anti-faces that were created relative to the race-specific (Asian and Caucasian) averages than to anti-faces created using the mixed-race average. Since adapt-test pairs that lie opposite to each other in face space generate larger identity aftereffects than non-opposite test pairs, these results suggest that Asian and Caucasian faces are coded using race-specific norms. We also found that identification thresholds were lower when targets were distributed around the race-specific norms than around the mixed-race norm, which is also consistent with a functional role for race-specific norms.

Armann, R. Jeffery, L. Calder, A. J. Bülthoff, I. Rhodes, G. (2010). Race-specific norms for coding face identity and a functional role for norms [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):706, 706a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/706, doi:10.1167/10.7.706. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 German Academic Exchange Service.
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