August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Large Amounts of Optical Blur Greatly Reduce Visual Acuity but Have Minimal Impacts upon 3-D Shape Discrimination
Author Affiliations
  • Amanda Beers
    Department of Psychology, Western Kentucky University
  • J. Farley Norman
    Department of Psychology, Western Kentucky University
  • Jessica Swindle
    Department of Psychology, Western Kentucky University
  • Alexandria Boswell
    Department of Psychology, Western Kentucky University
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 72. doi:10.1167/10.7.72
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      Amanda Beers, J. Farley Norman, Jessica Swindle, Alexandria Boswell; Large Amounts of Optical Blur Greatly Reduce Visual Acuity but Have Minimal Impacts upon 3-D Shape Discrimination. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):72. doi: 10.1167/10.7.72.

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Abstract

A single experiment evaluated observers' ability to visually discriminate 3-D object shape, where the 3-D structure was defined by motion, texture, Lambertian shading, and occluding contours. The observers' vision was degraded to varying degrees by blurring the experimental stimuli using 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 diopter convex lenses. The lenses reduced the observers' acuity from 1.26 min-1 (in the no blur conditions) to 0.13 min-1 (in the conditions with the most blur, 3.0 diopter lenses). This severe reduction in visual acuity (approaching legal blindness) had significant, but not meaningful, effects upon the observers' ability to discriminate 3-D shape (the observers d' values dropped from 3.6 in the no-blur conditions to 3.2 in the most severely blurred conditions). The observers' performance was facilitated by the objects' rotation in depth, regardless of the amount of blur. Our results indicate that high visual acuity is not a requirement for accurate global shape discrimination.

Beers, A. Norman, J. F. Swindle, J. Boswell, A. (2010). Large Amounts of Optical Blur Greatly Reduce Visual Acuity but Have Minimal Impacts upon 3-D Shape Discrimination [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):72, 72a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/72, doi:10.1167/10.7.72. [CrossRef]
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